One year after Sandy

This interactive project highlights some dramatic images from the aftermath of superstorm Sandy and the recovery efforts one year later. Photos on the left show the damage after the storm; photos on the right show those areas now. Move the slider -- the vertical divider between each set of photos -- left or right for the full photo. Mobile users can tap anywhere on a photo to move the slider. Internet Explorer users should note this is optimized for IE9 and above.

Freeport

The popular Fiore Bros. Fish Market which had been in business since 1920 on Freeport’s Nautical Mile burnt to the ground after superstorm Sandy. The restaurants and bars on the mile-long stretch that runs along Woodcleft Canal were ravaged by the storm. Most businesses reopened by Memorial Day, but some like Fiore Bros. are still recovering.

Photo credit: J. Conrad Williams Jr./Howard Schnapp (Oct. 30, 2012 and Oct. 7, 2013)

before after

Long Beach

Cars along Long Beach's Michigan Avenue were submerged by water and sand after superstorm Sandy. Long Beach was among the hardest hit communities on Long Island and continues its efforts to rebuild. FEMA provided the city, its schools and the Long Beach Medical Center more than $39 million in aid.

Photo credit: Howard Schnapp (Nov. 1, 2012 and Oct. 7, 2013)

before after

Lindenhurst

Homes along Bayview Avenue West in Lindenhurst were pummeled by superstorm Sandy. Another of the harder hit areas on Long Island, the village and its schools received more than $7 million in FEMA aid to assist in the recovery.

Photo credit: James Carbone (Oct. 31, 2012 and Oct. 6, 2013)

before after

Breezy Point

The Statue of Blessed Mother once overlooked the charred remains of the smoldering homes on Gotham Walk in Breezy Point. Superstorm Sandy devastated the area damaging or destroying more than 100 homes.

Photo credit: Patrick E. McCarthy (Oct. 30, 2012 and Oct. 4, 2013)

before after

Bayville

Ransom Beach in Bayville was completely submerged by waves as superstorm Sandy walloped the village tucked between the Sound and the waters of Oyster Bay. The storm surge reached 11.06 feet in Bayville.

Photo credit: Danielle Finkelstein (Oct. 29, 2012 and Oct. 4, 2013)

before after

Ronkonkoma

A home along West 5th Street in Ronkonkoma damaged by a fallen tree after superstorm Sandy ripped through Long Island had to be completely rebuilt. Sandy damaged or destroyed more than 95,000 structures on Long Island.

Photo credit: Ed Betz (Oct. 31, 2012); James Carbone (Oct. 24, 2013)

before after

Staten Island

Joe and John Toto's Restaurant and Bar was among the Staten Island businesses that suffered damage after superstorm Sandy. New York City officials have acknowledged that many residents are still waiting for financial aid to rebuild their damaged homes but said the city's infrastructure has been strengthened.

Photo credit: Charles Eckert (Oct. 31, 2012 and Oct. 6, 2013)

before after

Island Park

Superstorm Sandy lifted boats from the water onto the docks along Barnum Island in Island Park. The village received $872,029 in FEMA aid and is seeking $45 million in federal hazard mitigation funds to make drainage improvements and infrastructure repairs.

Photo credit: Howard Schnapp (Nov. 1, 2012 and Oct. 7, 2013)

before after

Manhattan

Joseph Leader, Metropolitan Transportation Authority vice president and chief maintenance officer, tours the inside of the South Ferry train station in Manhattan. The MTA was forced to shut down train, subway and bus service after superstorm Sandy.

Photo credit: Craig Ruttle (Oct. 31, 2012 and April 23, 2013)

before after

Long Beach boardwalk

Long Beach was one of the areas hit hardest by superstorm Sandy, and the most iconic part of the city to fall prey was the boardwalk. Officials said the city's rebuilt boardwalk was "substantially complete" in October with a pricetag of $44.2 million.

Photo credit: Alejandra Villa / Howard Schnapp (Jan. 15, 2013 and Oct. 7, 2013)

before after

Babylon

The Sea Breeze Cafe in Babylon Village was completely submerged by superstorm Sandy. Long Islanders received more than $87 million in Small Business Administration business loans for damage suffered by the storm.

Photo credit: Jessica Rotkiewicz / James Carbone (Oct. 30, 2012 and Oct. 6, 2013)

before after

Manhattan

Superstorm Sandy breached the seawalls of the Battery in lower Manhattan, swamped part of the subway system and poured into the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel (also known as the Hugh L. Carey Tunnel).

Photo credit: Getty Images / Craig Ruttle (Oct. 30, 2012 and Oct. 8, 2013)

before after

Massapequa

Some homes along Clocks Boulevard in Massapequa destroyed by superstorm Sandy still have not been rebuilt. Long Islanders received more than $725 million in Small Business Administration home loans.

Photo credit: Johnny Milano (Nov. 6, 2013 and Oct. 9, 2013)

before after

Breezy Point

Superstorm Sandy damaged or destroyed more than 100 homes in Breezy Point. Sandy inflicted about $33 billion in damage to the state and plunged more than 1 million households into darkness for more than two weeks.

Photo credit: Patrick E. McCarthy (Oct. 30, 2012 and Oct. 4, 2013)

before after

Island Park

Superstorm Sandy scattered boats and debris throughout Empire Boulevard in Island Park. The village is seeking $45 million in federal hazard mitigation funds to make village-wide drainage improvements and infrastructure repairs.

Photo credit: Jack McCoy / Danielle Finkelstein (Oct. 30, 2012 and Oct. 4, 2013)

before after
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