Storm extends college application deadlines

advertisement | advertise on newsday

Thanks to mega-storm Sandy, students facing Nov. 1 early application deadlines to some universities and colleges have more time to submit their material.

With widespread power outages, the National Association for College Admission Counseling called on colleges to extend deadlines, and a number of schools announced plans to do so.

The University of Virginia and Duke University pushed deadlines from Thursday until Sunday; Dartmouth, Columbia, Cornell, Yale, Stanford and Boston University until Monday; and the University of Pennsylvania until next Tuesday. Brown and Tufts universities said they will accept applications until Nov. 7. The University of Maryland said its deadline will be extended, but didn't give a date and told applicants to check back on its website.

"We hope this helps to relieve some of the stress and anxiety you might be feeling as the storm approaches your region," Columbia said in a message on its website.

Many selective schools have "early decision," "early action," or "priority" rounds whose Nov. 1 deadlines for applications and letters of recommendation fall on Thursday. The regular-decision deadlines at most schools are in January or on a rolling cycle throughout the academic year.

advertisement | advertise on newsday

Other institutions did not grant blanket extensions but said they would be flexible for affected applicants.

Princeton said those needing to file late should attach a brief explanation to their applications. Harvard posted a message on its admissions website saying it will accept applications and support materials beyond the deadline, whether due to the hurricane or a personal challenge, with a brief email explanation. Vanderbilt, on its website, said it will work with affected applicants past the Nov. 1 deadline and it is not necessary to call or email, adding, "We look forward to reviewing your application, but in the meantime, please stay safe!"

About 30 percent of public colleges and 60 percent of private ones offer either "early decision" or "early action" rounds in the fall, according to NACAC data. Generally, "early decision" means students commit to enrolling at that institution if accepted, and "early action" gives students early notification if they're accepted, but allows them to wait to hear from other colleges in the spring before deciding where to enroll.

The best of Newsday every day in your inbox. Get the Newsday Now newsletter!

Comments now uses Facebook for our comment boards. Please read our guidelines and connect your Facebook account to comment.

You also may be interested in: