Alec Baldwin has added his voice to an environmental campaign against a planned golf resort in East Quogue.

The actor, a Massapequa native, has recorded a 2-minute television commercial opposing The Hills at Southampton project, which environmental advocates say would develop the largest privately owned property in the state-protected Long Island Pine Barrens.

Discovery Land Co., based in Arizona, wants to build 118 residences designed as secondary homes for affluent buyers and a 98-acre golf course with a 155,760-square-foot clubhouse.

The project would develop part of a wooded 594-acre site off Sunrise Highway and requires special permission from the Southampton Town Board.

Citing concerns about water contamination, Baldwin calls the proposal “the biggest and baddest development on Long Island” in a commercial he recorded on behalf of the Long Island Pine Barrens Society, an environmental group.

Actor Alec Baldwin has added his voice to an environmental campaign against a planned golf resort in East Quogue. The Massapequa native has recorded a 2-minute television commercial opposing a project called The Hills at Southampton, which environmental advocates say would develop the largest privately owned property in the state-protected Long Island Pine Barrens. Jan. 28, 2016 Photo Credit: Long Island Pine Barrens Society

“Join us by telling your elected officials to kill The Hills,” he urges viewers in the TV spot.

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The commercial is scheduled to run on more than a dozen channels that reach eastern Long Island, according to a news release from the Long Island Pine Barrens Society.

Baldwin, who owns a house in Amagansett, has been a prominent donor and spokesman for East End environmental causes.

His commercial also criticizes a Southampton Town law that allows a supermajority of town board members to bypass zoning rules to greenlight projects they deem beneficial to the community. Discovery Land Co. is seeking approval for The Hills under that provision, known as the Planned Development District, or PDD, law.

Baldwin says such developments are “nothing more than density giveaways to wealthy developers” that “compromise water quality, increase traffic and raise taxes to pay for increased government services required by the new development.”

Southampton Town officials said in a statement that they “appreciate Mr. Baldwin’s interest in the Southampton community” and are conducting an environmental review of The Hills.

“All of the concerns referenced by Mr. Baldwin are part of the review,” the statement said, adding that an “extensive public hearing process” would follow.

Wayne Bruyn, a Southampton attorney representing the developer, said The Hills proposal is preferable to the 82 single-family homes that could be built on the site without special approval from the town board, which he said would have a much larger impact on East Quogue’s school.

“It’s not about no development versus development,” Bruyn said. “It’s clearly a choice of what form of development you want.” He declined to comment on Baldwin’s commercial.