Amityville trustees appointed Dina Shingleton Monday night as the village's first treasurer-clerk in at least 30 years.

As trustees seek long-term savings for the cash-strapped village, Shingleton, the Amityville Chamber of Commerce president, will do work previously performed by two employees, filling the treasurer's spot vacated by Donna Barnett last fall, and the clerk's spot, due to be vacated by Diane Sheridan on May 15.

"I am excited to get in there" and "continue the excellent service the village gives to its residents," Shingleton said in an interview Monday before a 5-0 village board vote to appoint her.

Shingleton, 39, will be paid $87,750 annually, saving the village more than $100,000 in yearly compensation costs after the consolidation, said trustee Nick LaLota, the village's budget officer.

"Village Hall staff is highly qualified and highly energetic, and Dina typifies that," LaLota said. "Residents want staff who are friendly to the customer, and we're looking to save money and optimize resources. That's why we chose Dina."

Consolidation of clerk and treasurer positions is not uncommon on Long Island. Nearby villages of Lindenhurst, Farmingdale and Massapequa Park have treasurer-clerks, Mayor James Wandell said at the village board meeting.

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Shingleton, who lives in Amityville, runs Darlings and Divas, a party planning company and boutique located in the village. A graduate of Baruch College's Zicklin School of Business, she was appointed chamber of commerce president last year.

A partner will take over day-to-day management of Darlings and Divas, Shingleton said, and she will step down from the chamber presidency when a replacement is found.

Shingleton comes to the village at a time when some residents have warned that staffing is too thin, although LaLota said the six-person administrative staff in Village Hall is at the same strength it was two years ago at the start of Wandell's administration.

Shingleton acknowledged that she will not have the luxury of ample resources. "We have to operate with less," she said. "Getting more productivity out of your current resources has sort of been the operational reality of business for over a decade."