Babylon Town OKs $300G for Sandy repairs

Billy Bornholdt, right, along with his son, also

Billy Bornholdt, right, along with his son, also named Billy, survey the damage to the fishing pier at Captree State Park in Babylon in the wake of superstorm Sandy. (Nov. 20, 2012) (Credit: newsday /Thomas A. Ferrara)

The Babylon Town Board has signed off on contracts worth more than $300,000 to three area engineering firms, an early step in a $22.5 million push to rebuild town parks, beaches, pools and docks damaged by Sandy before Memorial Day.

Construction is slated to begin by the end of the month, giving the firms until Thursday to prepare design documents for a host of projects from the barrier beaches to mainland parks.

Hauppauge-based Cashin Associates is to earn up to $130,709 for planning repairs to Cedar Beach Marina and Overlook Beach, and up to $20,825 for dredging at Venetian Shores Park in Lindenhurst and repair of town facilities at South Great Neck Road Marina in Copiague. It will also provide engineering services for miscellaneous repairs, billing the town at hourly rates of between $100 and $175 per employee.


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Refurbishing Overlook Beach alone could cost $6 million, Councilman Tony Martinez said on Thursday, a day after the board voted on the contracts. Sandy dumped so much sand onto the boat ramp at Venetian Shores Park that it's virtually unusable, he said.

Ronkonkoma-based Savik & Murray is to earn up to $130,604 for planning repairs to Tanner Park Marina in Copiague, where boardwalks and a fishing pier were destroyed. Another fishing pier, hit by a barge, was shifted off its foundations.

Mineola-based Sidney B. Bowne & Son is to earn up to $30,000 for repairs to the Tanner Park electrical system, which Martinez said was ruined by salt water.

"We're hoping to get as much back from FEMA as we can," town spokesman Kevin Bonner said.

Some facilities, built years ago, will be rebuilt to modern standards. That could cost the town more in the near term but Martinez said it was prudent with more storms expected. "We've got to prepare for the next one," he said.

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