Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton will turn their annual Hamptons vacation this month into a fundraising opportunity for Hillary, the leading Democratic candidate for president.

Democratic officials said Friday that the Clinton family's stay on Long Island will coincide with four events between Aug. 22 and 30 to benefit the former first lady, senator and secretary of state's campaign.

"As a candidate, presidential politics and fundraising always has to be part of the agenda," said Robert Zimmerman, a Democratic National Committeeman who has a Southampton home and is part of the Hillary Clinton events. "But when she's in the Hamptons, she's with neighbors and friends."

Nassau Democratic chairman Jay Jacobs, a Clinton friend, said the Hamptons and its many large, private estates "does offer the seclusion and security that she needs to still be able to have a relaxing time."

The Clintons vacationed in East Hampton in 2011 and 2012, Sagaponack in 2013 and Amagansett last year, and Zimmerman said they've been visiting the area since the 1980s. This year's fundraisers will be held in various South Fork regions.

On Aug. 22, Brooklyn Nets co-owner Artie Rabin and his wife, Selma, will host "A Conversation With Hillary Rodham Clinton" at their Water Mill home. Tickets start at $1,500.

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On Aug. 30, three events are scheduled: a pancake breakfast at the East Hampton home of investor Alan Patricof and his wife, Susan, with tickets starting at $500; a luncheon at the Southampton home of fashion designer Tory Burch, with tickets starting at $1,000; and "Full Moon on the Farm With Hillary Rodham Clinton," at the East Hampton home of environmentalist Hilary Leff and entertainment attorney Elliot Groffman, with tickets starting at $500.

Suffolk Democratic chairman Richard Schaffer said the Clinton campaign alerted him to the fundraisers, but the county party has no official role.

"They always let us know about them, but we don't participate," Schaffer said.Published reports say the Clintons will pay $100,000 to rent an Amagansett home, but Jacobs dismissed the public importance of that information.

"Where they choose to take it is their business," he said. "What I do know is that when she goes on these vacations, generally, she does an awful lot of reading and writing and thinking with the downtime."