A man accused of raping a woman in his East Hampton summer rental in 2013 after a night of drinking had only a scratch on a cuticle when he was photographed by police hours later, a detective testified Thursday.

After a photograph of the man, Jason Lee of Manhattan, was admitted into evidence at his trial in Riverhead, Lee's lawyer, Andrew Lankler, said he intended to introduce other police photos to buttress his defense that the woman consented.

Det. Ryan Hogan of the East Hampton town police testified that he took several pictures of Lee, 38, as he took his clothing for evidence following the reported rape Aug. 19 in Lee's rented house on Clover Leaf Lane.

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Hogan said the photos were taken to catalog the potential evidence "and any injuries."

Asked by Lankler whether there were injuries on Lee's body, the detective said: "He had like a little cut in the cuticle of his thumb."

Assistant District Attorney Kerriann Kelly had said in her opening statement Wednesday that Lee forced his way into a bathroom in the house, and struggled with the woman on the floor as he raped her. She finally got free by kicking him in the groin, the prosecutor said.

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Lee, who was a managing director at Goldman Sachs at the time, had been out with a friend celebrating his 37th birthday when he met the woman and her friends at a local bar. He left Goldman Sachs last year, a company spokesman said.

When the bar closed, they all went to Lee's rental, and the woman, a visitor from abroad, told investigators the rape occurred later in the morning.

Lee is charged with rape in the first degree and assault and faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted on the most serious charge. Judge Barbara Kahn is hearing the case without a jury in Suffolk County Court in Riverhead.

Retired Suffolk County Det. William Rathjen then took the witness stand and identified scores of pictures he had taken at the house. He also testified about several finger and palm prints he had identified in the house, but none of those in and around the bathroom were a match with Lee, he testified.

Lankler, of Manhattan, argued in his opening statement that none of the other people in the house at the time reported hearing any screams, and that the evidence in the case will show that what happened was "consistent with consensual sex."