The music was hot, the beer cold, and the crowd cool as the Great South Bay Music Festival wrapped up Sunday at Shorefront Park in Patchogue.

The lineup for the fourth day of the festival included classic rock acts from the 1960s and ’70s — Jesse Colin Young, Dave Mason, Poco, Eddie Money, the Zombies — and the live and let live spirit of those times.

“I’m here for the music, music, music,” said Robert Shainwald, 70, of Ridge, who was wearing a T-shirt that said “Dirty Hippie Anarchist.” “Good vibes, good scene.”

The first two days of the festival were dampened by rain, but Sunday’s weather reminded the thousands of music fans who came out why they live and play on Long Island. Boats bobbed on the bay, and a steady breeze from the water helped keep festivalgoers cool on a sunny day.

“It’s a beautiful day to be here,” said Jocelyn LaRocca, 39, of East Williston, who came to the festival with her husband, Anthony, 43, and their 2-year-old daughter, Athena. “I love live music.”

Karen Plaveck, 56, of Milford, Connecticut, also turned the festival into a family outing. She came with her daughter Sarah Plaveck, 32, of Yaphank.

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“I’m excited to see Dave Mason,” Karen said. “I’ve seen him a few times and he has always been great.”

Dozens of vendors sold everything from hamburgers and turkey legs to Tibetan prayer flags and Grateful Dead T-shirts. Colin Salmaggi, 31, of East Moriches, said business was brisk at his Long Island Woodwork booth, where he was selling LI-themed art.

“We’ve been here for four years now and we are beginning to get a following,” he said. “People come every year to get a new piece for their wall.”

Brian Gonzalez of Long Island Glass, had a big crowd surrounding his booth, which offered pipes, jewelry, fleece blankets and other items.

“This weekend had been amazing, even with the bad weather the first two days,” said Gonzalez, 45, of Selden.

“This is our 11th year here and I’ve seen it grow. The set up is smooth and the security is great. The security stays in the background, so do the police. It’s like they come out just enough to let you know that they are there.

“To have all these people here with alcohol, and not have any problems is great,” he added. “It’s a well-behaved crowd.”

Attendance figures were not immediately available Sunday night.

George Overin and his son, Daniel, 31, were dressed in historic garb as they manned the booth for Ye Pyrate Brotherhood, an organization dedicated to preserving pirate life.

“Pirates were involved in the history of this country,” said Overin, 62.

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Haley Gibbons, 20, of Bellport came to the festival to see her sister Shannon perform with her band, The Om-en, on the Jambalaya stage. She admitted she didn’t know much about Mason, Poco and the other acts on the main stage.

“But my grandma was excited to see Eddie Money,” Gibbons said.