Funds for a feasibility and design study of new sewers in Huntington Station have been given the go-ahead by the Suffolk County Legislature.

The county legislature last month approved $1.25 million from the Start Up New York/Suffolk County program, a state-sponsored business incentive program, to consider installing sewers from the Huntington Long Island Rail Road Station south to the Walt Whitman Shops.

The study will research issues such as how many pump stations are needed, which direction the lines will go, design, and other elements, Suffolk Legis. William Spencer (D-Centerport) said in announcing the funding on Monday.

“Sewers are the backbone for any vibrant community,” Spencer said at the Huntington Opportunity Resource Center in Huntington Station. “When you look at developing and building a community, proper sanitary flow is really important.”

County Executive Steve Bellone, Legis. Steve Stern (D-Dix Hills), Huntington Town Supervisor Frank Petrone, and town board members Susan Berland and Tracey Edwards joined Spencer in making the announcement.

There are no sewers on that stretch of road, officials said, adding that infrastructure improvements such as sewers will help lift the local economy, provide housing opportunities and revitalize the Huntington Station area.

The 2017 Suffolk County Capital Budget sets aside $20 million for the construction of the sewers in subsequent years. Spencer said undertaking the plan this year will allow allocation of that money in 2018.

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“Hopefully the study will come in that this is feasible, and we believe it is, and how to actually to do it,” Petrone said after the announcement. “It’s an opportunity to see a dream come true for the Station, where developers can come in and do commercial projects, start redoing buildings, people will sell buildings, others will buy them, strip malls will convert and start to revitalize, all increasing the economy of the Station.”

Huntington Station is in the midst of a multimillion-dollar revitalization effort led by Plainview-based master developer Renaissance Downtowns.