Take a book. Leave a book.

That’s the concept behind the Little Free Library installed at Huntington Town Hall that makes it easier for readers to find a book for free and pass one on to others.

Town of Huntington officials have joined with the Huntington Public Library to bring the Little Free Library outpost to the lobby of Town Hall. The free book exchange program has ignited book lovers around the world.

“What better place to have this little library when you have somewhere between 110,000 to 115,000 visitors a year come through the Town Hall lobby,” Town Supervisor Frank P. Petrone said. “It provides people an opportunity to browse and maybe it will encourage them to stop in their local library.”

The national Little Free Library organization was created in Hudson, Wisconsin, in 2009.

The libraries — essentially protected boxes that hold books people donate — provide books for anyone who wants to read them with no costs, sign-outs and strings attached.

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The idea is to take one of the books in the box and exchange it for a book the reader has finished and would like to share. Anyone taking one of the books can keep it. There are 50,000 Little Free Library book exchanges around the world, in all U.S. states and 70 countries.

Generally the books are placed in a decorated enclosed box. The Huntington Public Library recently obtained and decorated one of the boxes, which are about 18 inches long and 14 inches deep, and asked Petrone for permission to install it in Town Hall.

Readers can find a handful of the birdhouse-like boxes in front of homes and public libraries around Long Island, including along the Long Beach boardwalk.

Huntington library officials stocked the Town Hall box with the initial offerings, including James Patterson’s novel “I, Michael Bennett,” the novel “The Devil Wears Prada” by Lauren Weisberger, the children’s book “Disney Bedtime Favorites” and the satirical collection “1,000 Unforgettable Senior Moments,” town officials said.

Library personnel will make sure the box remains stocked with a range of offerings for adults, children and teens. Petrone said the program is a great way for people to help their unwanted books find new homes and for them to obtain books they have wanted to read for some time or to explore new authors.

“At the Huntington Public Library, we encourage literacy in many different ways, whether it be through books from our library or through exchanges like The Little Free Library,” library director Joanne Adam said in a news release.