Crescent Beach contamination, sewering study to cost Nassau $2 million

Mussel shells dot Crescent Beach, which is closed

Mussel shells dot Crescent Beach, which is closed to bathers due to unacceptably high bacteria levels, on Wednesday, May 30, 2012. Photo Credit: Newsday / Audrey C. Tiernan

advertisement | advertise on newsday

Nassau County will conduct a $2 million study on sewering parts of Glen Cove near a beach that has been closed since 2009 because of elevated bacterial levels, officials announced Tuesday.

Nassau will fund the feasibility study for the installation of public sewers in the North Shore area near Crescent Beach. A sewer system would replace aging septic systems, county officials said.

"It's important that we reopen Crescent Beach so that it once again serves as a beautiful destination for families, seniors and beachgoers," County Executive Edward Mangano said in a statement. He called the installation of sewers on the North Shore "an important public health initiative."

The study will begin later this year and focus on about 70 homes in the area surrounding the beach, Nassau Department of Public Works spokesman Michael M. Martino Jr. said. The general boundary will be Crescent Beach Road to the east and north, Hempstead Harbor to the west and Woolsey Road to the south.

The eventual sewer work will cost about $10 million, but the study will determine how to proceed with the project, the time frame and a more precise cost, Martino said.

Rep. Steve Israel (D-Huntington) said in a statement that "Crescent Beach is a true treasure for the City of Glen Cove and for too long has been contaminated and unsafe for residents to swim and enjoy."

advertisement | advertise on newsday

Glen Cove Mayor Reggie Spinello said in a statement that the study, along with other action, "will result in a marked improvement in the water quality in our area."

Sea Cliff's main business strip, Sea Cliff Avenue, will be included in the environmental study, Village Mayor Bruce Kennedy said.

The best of Newsday every day in your inbox. Get the Newsday Now newsletter!

Comments now uses Facebook for our comment boards. Please read our guidelines and connect your Facebook account to comment.

You also may be interested in: