You can still pop a cork at Vineyard 48.

A judge this week issued a temporary stay of a State Liquor Authority decision revoking the license of the controversial but popular North Fork winery, the attorney for the Cutchogue vineyard said.

The decision by a Manhattan Supreme Court judge was issued Monday morning and another court hearing is scheduled for next Thursday in Manhattan. An employee at the winery said it was open Tuesday.

"We'll continue to work with the community to ensure our operation continues to reflect the fact that we operate now as a model citizen," Peter Sullivan, the Manhattan attorney for the winery, said Tuesday.

Supervisor Scott Russell said the winery would be expected to operate within the boundaries of a planning commission decision, which limited the uses and barred the "DJ Dance Parties" that neighbors complained blared vulgarities and music through their yards.

The liquor authority ruled against Vineyard 48 on six of eight charges brought against the establishment. The winery "has been continually operating as a night club including DJ and a dance party type atmosphere," according to the revocation order.

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Southold police have responded to "voluminous complaints of loud noise and profanities being broadcast via amplified public address system" and "highly intoxicated persons leaving the establishment."

Sullivan has said his client -- licensed as Joseph Paul Winery Inc. -- was unfairly targeted. He added Vineyard 48's business model is not so different from other wineries on the East End, which have moved beyond the sip, swish and spit era.