Fuel storage site in Great Neck could become housing

Under the proposal by AvalonBay Communities Inc., a

Under the proposal by AvalonBay Communities Inc., a nearly 4-acre site on East Shore Road that currently contains fuel tanks would be cleaned up and used to build a 191-unit luxury apartment complex. (Credit: Google Maps)

A contaminated waterfront fuel storage site in Great Neck could be the location of new luxury apartments under a proposal shopped at the Great Neck Village board meeting Tuesday night.

Under the proposal by AvalonBay Communities Inc., a nearly 4-acre site on East Shore Road that currently contains fuel tanks would be cleaned up and used to build a 191-unit luxury apartment complex. The proposed building would include four stories of residences as well as courtyards, a waterfront promenade and a pool, according to the developer.

Chris Capece, senior development director of AvalonBay, said the complex would target young professionals and empty-nesters, with some of the units renting for as much as $5,000 a month. Ten percent of the housing will be workforce housing, according to the developer.


MORE: newsday.com/greatneck | Sign up for community newsletters
SOCIAL: @Newsday_TonH | @NewsdayTowns | Google+


"This can activate the waterfront," said Matt Whalen, senior vice president of development for AvalonBay. "Our residents will enjoy something you can't enjoy right now."

For the project to move forward, the village would have to create a new zoning district for the property and the state Department of Environmental Conservation would have to approve the cleanup plan for the site, currently owned by the Shapiro family. The family and the developer have been working together to create a plan to remediate the site, and the family will bear much of the cost of the cleanup, according to the developer.

Board members questioned the developer on issues of traffic, taxes and the number of school-aged children at the development. One resident asked whether the developer had taken into account possible damage from another storm such as superstorm Sandy.

"It's addressed a little, but not enough," said Mayor Ralph Kreitzman, who added that the board needed to study additional documents the developer submitted. Kreitzman said he expected that the board will move to hire a planning and zoning consultant to advise it on the rezoning.

advertisement | advertise on newsday

Your town

Get the latest news and information about your community, all in one place.

What's this? Send us your feedback

Sign up for community newsletters

Choose a community

advertisement | advertise on newsday