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The Fire Island Lighthouse operates year round, illuminating (Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

The Fire Island Lighthouse operates year round, illuminating a beacon of light every 7.5 seconds. The beacon can be seen up to 21 miles away. (Jan. 1, 2011)

New Year's Day 2011 at Fire Island Lighthouse

Every New Year's Day for the last decade the Fire Island Lighthouse Preservation Society has conducted nature walks and tower tours. On Jan 1. 2011, nearly 50 people showed up for the nature walk and even more came out for a tour of the lighthouse.

The Fire Island Lighthouse operates year round, illuminating
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

The Fire Island Lighthouse operates year round, illuminating a beacon of light every 7.5 seconds. The beacon can be seen up to 21 miles away. (Jan. 1, 2011)

Snow from a blizzard a week ago coats
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

Snow from a blizzard a week ago coats sand dunes in this view from the Fire Island Lighthouse. (Jan. 1, 2011)

A look down from the Fire Island Lighthouse
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

A look down from the Fire Island Lighthouse of people photographing the historic structure. (Jan. 1, 2011)

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Nature walk tour guide Samantha Rosen, 20, of
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

Nature walk tour guide Samantha Rosen, 20, of Oceanside explains how the juniper plant, which grows on the beach, is a key ingredient in gin. (Jan. 1, 2011)

Signs along the boardwalk at Field 5 at
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

Signs along the boardwalk at Field 5 at Robert Moses State Park explain that it is illegal to feed the deer. (Jan. 1, 2011)

A view from the Fire Island Lighthouse of
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

A view from the Fire Island Lighthouse of a pier in Great South Bay (Jan. 1, 2011)

Construction of the second Fire Island Lighthouse was
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

Construction of the second Fire Island Lighthouse was completed in 1858. (Jan. 1, 2011)

A view from the Fire Island Lighthouse looking
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

A view from the Fire Island Lighthouse looking west toward Robert Moses State Park and the park's water tower. (Jan. 1, 2011)

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Robert Moses State Park is heavily populated with
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

Robert Moses State Park is heavily populated with deer, which keep poison ivy, another populous species, at bay. (Jan. 1, 2011)

Bob Pedian, 14, of Oceanside, right, volunteers on
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

Bob Pedian, 14, of Oceanside, right, volunteers on nature tours at Fire Island. He explains to Don and Barbara Coburn, of Seaford, the difference between a pitch pine bush and a Japanese black pine. (Jan. 1, 2011)

Nature walk tour guide Samantha Rosen, 20, of
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

Nature walk tour guide Samantha Rosen, 20, of Oceanside leads more than twenty people to the Fire Island Lighthouse. (Jan. 1, 2011)

This structure, to be completed in May, will
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

This structure, to be completed in May, will house the original Fresnel lens from the Fire Island Lighthouse, which was built in 1858. The lens was in service until 1933 when it was removed. It was on display for many years at the Franklin Institute, a science museum in Philadelphia. A restoration of the lens is expected to be completed by Memorial Day weekend. (Jan. 1, 2011)

Irene Rosen, 59, an interpreter ranger on Fire
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

Irene Rosen, 59, an interpreter ranger on Fire Island for more than 20 years, explains how a ship once got lost at sea when it was unable to locate the lighthouse. Crew members were frozen to the ship's mast and are now buried in Patchogue. (Jan. 1, 2011)

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Nature walk guide Samantha Rosen, 20, highlights some
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

Nature walk guide Samantha Rosen, 20, highlights some species in the brush in front of the Fire Island Lighthouse. She is studying biology at Salisbury University in Maryland. (Jan. 1, 2011)

Nearly 50 people showed up on New Year's
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

Nearly 50 people showed up on New Year's Day for the annual nature walk and tower tour. New Year's Day is the most popular day of the year for the lighthouse. (Jan. 1, 2011)

The view looking east from the Fire Island
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

The view looking east from the Fire Island Lighthouse. (Jan. 1, 2011)

Cleaning supplies are used by volunteers from Brookhaven
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

Cleaning supplies are used by volunteers from Brookhaven National Laboratory to clean the glass on top of the Fire Island Lighthouse. (Jan. 1, 2011)

The beacon atop of the Fire Island Lighthouse
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

The beacon atop of the Fire Island Lighthouse boasts two 1,000 watt bulbs that cast a light that can be seen up to 21 miles away. Although there are two, only one is lit at a time. When one bulb burns out, the other automatically switches on. The beacon makes one full revolution every 7.5 seconds. (Jan. 1, 2011)

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A view from the Fire Island Lighthouse looking
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

A view from the Fire Island Lighthouse looking toward the Atlantic Ocean (Jan. 1, 2011)

A woman walks dogs on the ocean beach
(Credit: T.C. McCarthy)

A woman walks dogs on the ocean beach near the Fire Island Lighthouse. (Jan. 1, 2011)

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