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Audrey Zhang of Island Trees Memorial Middle School (Credit: Google )

Audrey Zhang of Island Trees Memorial Middle School was named the national Doodle 4 Google winner. Her doodle is being featured on Google's homepage on June 9, 2014.

New York Google doodles

Levittown fifth-grader Audrey Zhang's Google doodle is live on Google's homepage on June 9, 2014. Zhang won a $30,000 college scholarship and her school, Island Trees Middle School, will receive a $50,000 Google for Education technology grant. Here, Newsday takes a look back at other Google doodles with New York ties. The information comes from Google's collection at http://www.google.com/doodles.

Lady Liberty, doodled

Ryan Germick, a Google team creative lead, drew
(Credit: Google )

Ryan Germick, a Google team creative lead, drew this doodle for Independence Day in 2011. The doodle includes his favorite sights from places he has lived, including San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge and, of course, New York's Statue of Liberty.

Electric doodle

Nikola Tesla's is renowned for his pioneering with
(Credit: Google )

Nikola Tesla's is renowned for his pioneering with AC electrical current, as well as far-reaching and momentous discoveries in radio, engineering, theoretical physics and sound transmission. His Wardenclyffe laboratory in Shoreham is where the great Serbian scientist did much of his work.

Travels with Steinbeck

Legendary author John Steinbeck lived in a little
(Credit: Google)

Legendary author John Steinbeck lived in a little house in Sag Harbor overlooking Noyac Bay from the mid-1950s until a year before his death in 1968. The home was the starting point of the cross-country road trip he took with his poodle that inspired his book, ?Travels with Charley.? This doodle ran on Feb. 27, 2014, which would have been his 112th birthday.

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The spirit of Brooklyn

On what would have been Will Eisner's 94th
(Credit: Google )

On what would have been Will Eisner's 94th birthday, Google celebrated the American comics pioneer and creator of The Spirit. Google tipped a cap to he Brooklyn-born Eisner, writing that he was "one of the first cartoonists to understand the power of visual education."

The great DNA discovery

Rosalind Franklin's research helped lead to the discovery
(Credit: Google)

Rosalind Franklin's research helped lead to the discovery of the structure of DNA. The British scientist died at 37, but her research was used by a team that would go on to win the Nobel Prize. That team included James Watson, who would later become the director at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

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