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The training vessel Liberty is moored at the (Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

The training vessel Liberty is moored at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point. (Feb. 22, 2012)

U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point in disarray

The U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, a fixture in Kings Point since 1943, is in upheaval with an empty superintendent's chair and a proposed budget cut. Meanwhile, the federal service academy's facilities are deteriorating, leading to gas leaks in buildings and rotting decks at piers. Recent developments have some alumni and parents of students worried about the future of the school, from which graduates of the four-year program leave with Coast Guard licenses and Navy Reserve appointments.

Seven people have been appointed to an advisory
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Seven people have been appointed to an advisory board that will be examining instruction and management at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point. (Feb. 22, 2012)

Marching in a tight formation, midshipmen at the
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Marching in a tight formation, midshipmen at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point head to their barracks during the lunch break. The federal service academy could face cuts to its 2013 budget. (Feb. 22, 2012)

Marching in a tight formation, midshipmen at the
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Marching in a tight formation, midshipmen at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point head to their barracks during the lunch break. The federal service academy could face cuts to its 2013 budget. (Feb. 22, 2012)

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A carbon monoxide leak in January 2012 affecting
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

A carbon monoxide leak in January 2012 affecting Barry and Jones Halls, seen here, at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point sent 39 midshipmen to the hospital. (Feb. 22, 2012)

A temporary hot water system is seen outside
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

A temporary hot water system is seen outside Barry and Jones Halls at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point. The portable system was in use shortly after water-heater damage from a January 2012 fire, which was traced to a problem in the ventilation system. (Feb. 22, 2012)

One of the original walk-in freezers with large
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

One of the original walk-in freezers with large wooden doors is still in use at the dining hall at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point. (Feb. 22, 2012)

Electrical panel boxes from the 1940s are still
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Electrical panel boxes from the 1940s are still in use at the dining hall at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point. (Feb. 22, 2012)

A historic naval gun marks the approach to
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

A historic naval gun marks the approach to Wiley Hall at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point. (Feb. 22, 2012)

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Viewed from Mallory Pier, the former Chrysler mansion,
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Viewed from Mallory Pier, the former Chrysler mansion, now known as Wiley Hall, serves as the administration building for the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point. (Feb. 22, 2012)

A danger sign is meant to keep people
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

A danger sign is meant to keep people off the deteriorating 600-foot wooden Mallory Pier at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point. (Feb. 22, 2012)

The training vessel Liberty is moored at the
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

The training vessel Liberty is moored at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point. (Feb. 22, 2012)

Rotted planks are an indication of the deterioration
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Rotted planks are an indication of the deterioration that has made the 600-foot-long Mallory Pier at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point unsafe and unusable. (Feb. 22, 2012)

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