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Tulip trees are distinguished by the shape of (Credit: Amy Onorato)

Tulip trees are distinguished by the shape of their leaves, which resemble the shape of the flower.

Wilderness Act Turns 50, is celebrated on LI

The Wilderness Act, signed into law on Sept. 3, 1964, gave federal protection to 9.1 million acres of wild lands across the United States. In honor of the bills 50th anniversary, Sagamore Hill National Historic Site naturalist Lois Lindberg, 62, held a special nature tour that honored the wildlife and conservation efforts on the grounds that once belonged to famed naturalist and former President Theodore Roosevelt, who helped spearhead wildlife conservation in America.

The nature trail in Sagamore Hill National Historic
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(Credit: Amy Onorato)

The nature trail in Sagamore Hill National Historic Site is about three-quarters of a mile on an incline. It begins and ends at the Old Orchard Museum, with access to the beach at Eel Creek at the bottom of the hill.

The oldest apple tree at Sagamore Hill National
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(Credit: Amy Onorato)

The oldest apple tree at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site in Oyster Bay has been standing since before 1938 and still bears heritage (also known as heirloom) apples.

When President Theodore Roosevelt lived at Sagamore Hill
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(Credit: Amy Onorato)

When President Theodore Roosevelt lived at Sagamore Hill in the late 1800s and early 1900s, the land surrounding the property was used as a family farm. Wooden structures with steps, like the one pictured here, were used to navigate across gated cow pastures.

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After superstorm Sandy, downed trees blocked many of
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(Credit: Amy Onorato)

After superstorm Sandy, downed trees blocked many of the pathways in the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site forest in Oyster Bay. Instead of removing the trees completely during post-Sandy cleanup, the fallen trees were cut up and left in the woods to encourage ecosystem growth.

The bridge at Eel Creek at Sagamore Hill
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(Credit: Amy Onorato)

The bridge at Eel Creek at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site was destroyed in superstorm Sandy. The original wooden structure was ripped off its foundation during the storm. With the help of a grant from the U.S. National Park Service, Sagamore Hill was able to reconstruct the bridge using wood and recycled plastic to protect the structure from harsh weather conditions. The bridge reopened in December 2013.

Wooden barriers are dug into the ground along
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(Credit: Amy Onorato)

Wooden barriers are dug into the ground along the nature trail at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site in Oyster Bay to protect the trails, which are on an incline, from erosion and flooding. The project was an effort to protect the nature trail from future destruction after superstorm Sandy.

The bridge at Eel Creek at Sagamore Hill
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(Credit: Amy Onorato)

The bridge at Eel Creek at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site in Oyster Bay stretches over salt marshes and out to a Long Island Sound beach. It is part of the protected Oyster Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

Tulip trees are distinguished by the shape of
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(Credit: Amy Onorato)

Tulip trees are distinguished by the shape of their leaves, which resemble the shape of the flower.

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The Old Orchard Museum at Sagamore Hill National
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(Credit: Amy Onorato)

The Old Orchard Museum at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site is the former home of President Theodore Roosevelt's son, Theodore Roosevelt Jr. The fields directly in front of the home used to be the family's apple orchard. Although most of the trees have been removed, some new saplings have been planted to carry on the traditional use of the grounds.

Sagamore Hill National Historic Site naturalist Lois Lindberg,
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(Credit: Amy Onorato)

Sagamore Hill National Historic Site naturalist Lois Lindberg, 62, of Locust Valley, leads a nature walk exploring the forest behind the Old Orchard Museum in Oyster Bay. The special tour honored former President Theodore Roosevelt's conservation efforts on the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act.

Sassafras can be found along the nature trail
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(Credit: Amy Onorato)

Sassafras can be found along the nature trail in the forest at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site in Oyster Bay. The plant is known for its sweet and exotic scent, and is commonly used in oils and soaps. It is also can be an ingredient in root beer.

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