Scattered glitches resurfaced along the LIRR on Monday night, making for uneven service as some lines saw delays blamed on various snags — equipment trouble, a fallen utility pole and residual delays, officials said.

By 11 p.m. Monday, a train from Penn Station that had been expected in Huntington at 10:49 p.m. was running 13 minutes late due to equipment trouble, Long Island Rail Road officials said.

A utility pole that fell in the morning in Oceanside was still causing delays well past afternoon rush hour, making a westbound train from Long Beach that was due in Manhattan at 10:44 p.m. some 16 minutes late.

And a train due in Oyster Bay at 11:04 p.m. was operating 16 minutes late because another late train was in front of it, officials said.

A spokeswoman said that almost all of the lines had been operating with minimal problems around 5 p.m. as the region braced for the arrival of a fierce nor’easter that threatened to throw a wrench into the LIRR system.

Nancy Gamerman, the spokeswoman, said some of the problems that beset the railroad throughout the day had been solved as they cropped up — though some, like the downed pole in Oceanside, lasted all day.

At around 5 p.m., the West Hempstead and Long Beach lines were running up to 11 minutes behind schedule due to equipment failure and the downed utility pole in Oceanside, respectively.

Downed poles caused delays on the Port Washington branch, where service was suspended in both directions about 9 a.m. between Port Washington and Great Neck, and on the Long Beach branch, where the pole fell in Oceanside.

Westbound traffic was also affected by signal problems east of Mineola, officials said in a tweet that reported delays of up to 18 minutes on Penn Station-bound trains.

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Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s office said the LIRR “is deploying extra staff to deal with any potential track and power issues.”

LIRR storm prep measures typically include having additional personnel available to respond to fallen tree limbs and utility poles, to address power issues and repair broken crossing gates, and to check and clear drains.

The MTA has checked and secured construction equipment at its bridges and tunnels in preparation for the storm, and will monitor them closely throughout. The MTA has also inspected roadway surfaces and drainage systems and checked emergency supplies.