Benjamin Netanyahu, Barack Obama speak on Iran 'red line'

President Barack Obama meets with Israeli Prime Minister

President Barack Obama meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (March 5, 2012) (Credit: AP)

The United States is committed to Israel's security and the two nations are in "full agreement" on the goal of preventing Iran from getting a nuclear weapon, President Barack Obama told Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

"The prime minister welcomed President Obama's commitment before the United Nations General Assembly to do what we must to achieve that goal," according to a White House statement.

Obama and Netanyahu spoke by telephone Friday, the White House said in a statement. The call was Obama's only publicly announced one-on-one discussion with a foreign leader during a week when the United Nations General Assembly is holding its opening session.

The White House statement didn't say how long the conversation lasted or give details about the discussion.

The conversation followed weeks of tensions between the leaders over how aggressively to confront Iran over its atomic weapons program. It also comes as Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney tries to use the rift to raise doubts with American Jewish voters about Obama's commitment to Israel.

Netanyahu has been pushing the U.S. and western nations to set a "red line" at which point Iran's nuclear development would warrant a military response. Obama, while urging more time for negotiations and for economic sanctions to pressure Iran, has said the U.S. won't allow the Islamic Republic to get a nuclear weapon.

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