+-
(Credit: Rob Wilson, 2011)

"On the Trail of the Rising Sun" is a 2008 mosaic mural by artist Malin Abrahamsson that is in the Valley Stream Long Island Rail Road train station. Made out of glass and ceramic pieces, it can be seen on the west stair wall, on the escalator wall and on the platform waiting room. Swedish-born and Brooklyn-based Abrahamsson creates a broad swath of green bands punctuated with more detailed mosaics of local sights, such as a pair of Canadian geese, a house, and the nearby clock tower. Other mosaics show a pale blue sky with a touch of green at the bottom, a seagull in flight, and floating clouds. The murals evoke the rolling lawns and shrubs of the close-by suburbs, under expansive skies. The artwork was commissioned by and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

Eye-catching art along the LIRR

Here are some of the sculptures and installations in Long Island Rail Road stations.

(Credit: Rob Wilson, 2011)

"On the Trail of the Rising Sun" is a 2008 mosaic mural by artist Malin Abrahamsson that is in the Valley Stream Long Island Rail Road train station. Made out of glass and ceramic pieces, it can be seen on the west stair wall, on the escalator wall and on the platform waiting room. Swedish-born and Brooklyn-based Abrahamsson creates a broad swath of green bands punctuated with more detailed mosaics of local sights, such as a pair of Canadian geese, a house, and the nearby clock tower. Other mosaics show a pale blue sky with a touch of green at the bottom, a seagull in flight, and floating clouds. The murals evoke the rolling lawns and shrubs of the close-by suburbs, under expansive skies. The artwork was commissioned by and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

(Credit: Rob Wilson, 2011)

"On the Trail of the Rising Sun" is a 2008 mosaic mural by artist Malin Abrahamsson, in the Valley Stream Long Island Rail Road train station. Made out of glass and ceramic pieces, it can be seen on the west stair wall, on the escalator wall and on the platform waiting room. Swedish-born and Brooklyn-based Abrahamsson creates a broad swath of green bands punctuated with more detailed mosaics of local sights, such as a pair of Canadian geese, a house, and the nearby clock tower. Other mosaics show a pale blue sky with a touch of green at the bottom, a seagull in flight, and floating clouds. The murals evoke the rolling lawns and shrubs of the close-by suburbs, under expansive skies. The artwork was commissioned by and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

(Credit: Carson Fox)

"Blue Sky Pursuits" is a 2009 window installation by artist Carson Fox at the Seaford Long Island Rail Road train station using laminated and tempered glass. The installation consists of 14 laminated glass windows that extend the sky and create a fantasy filled with butterflies and birds. Dots of clear glass trace their flights their flights, meandering, overlapping and reveaing paths of movement, evoking migration and travel. Artist Carson Fox used bird and butterfly images inspired from Victorian-era engravings. The artwork was commissioned and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / Audrey C. Tiernan)

"Blue Sky Pursuits" is a 2009 work by artist Carson Fox that is installed at the Seaford Long Island Rail Road station. The installation consists of 14 laminated glass windows that extend the sky and create a fantasy filled with butterflies and birds. The artwork was commissioned and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program. Here, a detail of the installation.

(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / Audrey C. Tiernan)

"Blue Sky Pursuits" is a 2009 work by artist Carson Fox that is installed at the Seaford Long Island Rail Road station. The work consists of 14 laminated glass windows that extend the sky and create a fantasy filled with butterflies and birds. The artwork was commissioned and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

Carson Fox is seen with her work
(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / Audrey C. Tiernan)

Carson Fox is seen with her work "Blue Sky Pursuits," which is installed at the Long Island Rail Road station in Seaford. The 2009 work consists of 14 laminated glass windows that extend the sky and create a fantasy filled with butterflies and birds. Fox used bird and butterfly images inspired from Victorian-era engravings, an aesthetic where natural life is a lush and swarming profusion. The artwork was commissioned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

"Planting," dedicated to Long Island tree farmers, is a 1995 sculptural installation by artist Alice Adams outside the Ronkonkoma Long Island Rail Road station. The piece is composed of planters and trees, with paving, plantings and curved brick walls that define the space. Working with landscape architects, Adams had trees planted in rows within islands created by brick walls and placed "tree ball" concrete planters in the paved areas. The artwork was commissioned and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

(Credit: Rob Wilson, 2011)

"Ghost Series," a 1994 ceramic mural by artist Andrew Leicester, is among the MTA Arts for Transit program works. This one is installed in Penn Station in Manhattan. The piece consists of terra-cotta wall murals in five locations and porcelain enamel above the escalator. They are meant to evoke the building's illustrious predecessor, the 1910 Pennsylvania Station building by McKim, Mead and White that was demolished in 1963. Fragments of the old Penn Station are hidden in the lower depths of the building that replaced it, and the murals symbolically reveal the old building now hidden behind new walls.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
(Credit: Rob Wilson, 2011)

"Ghost Series" is a 1994 ceramic mural by artist Andrew Leicester that is installed in Penn Station in Manhattan. The piece consists of terra-cotta wall murals in five locations, and porcelain enamel above the escalator. The works are meant to evoke the building's illustrious predecessor, the 1910 Pennsylvania Station building by McKim, Mead and White that was demolished in 1963, triggering the historic preservation movement. The artwork was commissioned and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / Audrey C. Tiernan)

"For My Grandfather Noye Pride, A Locomotive Engineer," is a 1998 mural of faceted glass in a windscreen by Sag Harbor artist Joe Zucker. As part of the MTA's permanent collection the work is installed at the Huntington Long Island Rail Road station. The work's centerpiece is a 130-foot fantasy train that chugs animatedly down the platform. An oversize lobster, a giant duck, jumbo potatoes, a big bluefish, the Montauk Lighthouse and a sailboat are incorporated into the mural. As Zucker writes, "It is in memory of my grandfather and uncles who served as engineers and firemen on the trains of a distant past." The is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

This duck is part of the faceted-glass mural
(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / Audrey C. Tiernan)

This duck is part of the faceted-glass mural "For My Grandfather Noye Pride, A Locomotive Engineer," a 1998 mural by Sag Harbor artist Joe Zucker. As part of the MTA Arts for Transit initiative, the work is installed at the Huntington Long Island Rail Road station. Its centerpiece is a 130-foot fantasy train that chugs animatedly down the platform; also incorporated into the mural are an oversize lobster, a giant duck, jumbo potatoes, a big bluefish, the Montauk Lighthouse and a sailboat. As Zucker writes, "It is in memory of my grandfather and uncles who served as engineers and firemen on the trains of a distant past."

(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / Audrey C. Tiernan)

"For My Grandfather Noye Pride, A Locomotive Engineer," a 1998 mural of faceted glass, decorates a windscreen at the Long Island Rail Road station in Huntington. Sag Harbor artist Joe Zucker created the works; its centerpiece is a 130-foot fantasy train that chugs animatedly down the platform. Long Island icons -- an oversize lobster, a giant duck, jumbo potatoes, a big bluefish, the Montauk Lighthouse and a sailboat -- are incorporated into the work. As Zucker writes, "It is in memory of my grandfather and uncles who served as engineers and firemen on the trains of a distant past." The artwork was commissioned and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

(Credit: Patrick Cashin)

"Morning Transit, Hempstead Plain, and Evening Transit, Hempstead Plain," is a 2002 mosaic mural by artist Roy Nicholson that is installed at the Hicksville Long Island Rail Road station. Nicholson's work aims to take viewers back in time to when the area around Hicksville was a prairie landscape as if seen from a speeding train. The colors vary according to the time of day depicted -- soft green and blue hues for sunrise in "Morning Transit," and red and blue hues for sunset in "Evening Transit." The artwork was commissioned by and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / Audrey C. Tiernan)

"Lost and Found: An Excavation Project" is a 2005 series of cast-bronze sculptures by artist Ron Baron that is installed in the Hempstead Long Island Rail Road station. Baron, who refers to himself as a "cultural archaeologist," culled everyday objects from streets and sidewalks, thrift shops and garage sales and then formed his monuments of the finds. Among the Long Island-related items are an edition of Newsday featuring the Islanders winning the Stanley Cup, an NBA basketball (Julius Erving was from nearby Roosevelt), a Jets football reflecting the team practices at Hofstra University, and yearbooks from Hempstead High School highlighting community events, such as Martin Luther King's address to students of the high school in 1968. The is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program. Here, a New York Jets football is part of the sculpture.

Part of the MTA Art's in Transit program,
(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / Audrey C. Tiernan)

Part of the MTA Art's in Transit program, "Lost and Found: An Excavation Project" is installed at the Long Island Rail Road station in Hempstead. In the 2005 series of cast-bronze sculptures, artist Ron Baron formed monuments from everyday objects culled from streets and sidewalks, thrift shops and garage sales. Among the Long Island-related items are an edition of Newsday featuring the Islanders winning the Stanley Cup, a Jets football reflecting the team practices at Hofstra University, and yearbooks from Hempstead High School. The artwork was commissioned and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program. Here, Ron Baron takes a seat on one of the sculptures.

(Credit: Peter Mauss / ESTO, 2010)

"Illuminated Station" (2005), part of the MTA's permanent art collection, is an installation of lighting and projection on the roof and facade of the Greenport Long Island Rail Road station by artist Anita Thacher. The station house's roof is outlined with LED illumination in blue, and the areas surrounding the building have a deeper blue light. From inside the building comes a yellow glow suggesting candlelight or gaslight. Light projected on the station walls and roof forms images of an American Indian pictograph, emphasizing Long Island's first inhabitants. The man and canoe in the pictograph were made from a plaster cast of an artifact discovered in Orient. The artwork is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit.

The Long Island Rail Road's Broadway station, in
(Credit: Seong Kwon)

The Long Island Rail Road's Broadway station, in Flushing, Queens, is home to "Celadon Remnants," a 2008 mosaic mural by artist Jean Shin. The large-scale mosaic murals feature the shapes and silhouettes of pottery and were created from thousands of celadon fragments, hand-selected and donated by the city of Icheon, South Korea. The artwork was commissioned by and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

(Credit: Rob Wilson, 2010)

"Overlook," a 2009 sculpture by Allan Wexler and Ellen Wexler made in collaboration with di Domenico + Partners, is installed in the Long Island Rail Road's Atlantic Terminal in Brooklyn. It is part of the MTA's Arts for Transit initiative. The designers aimed to create a special place of arrival in the entry pavilion that reaches from the street level down to the ticket office, waiting room and LIRR and NYC Transit subways. The Wexlers two-story sculptural balcony and wall evokes the adventure of travel. Made out of rocky granite, the piece's title, "Overlook," refers to the scenic overlooks often found in national parks, where travelers are encouraged to pause and take in the larger scene. The bands of granite also refer to nature found underground in layers of rock.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
(Credit: Rob Wilson)

"The Narrative History of Merrick / Bellmore" is a 1993 mosaic of hand-painted porcelain tiles by artist Alan Sonfist that is installed on the platform columns at the Merrick and Bellmore Long Island Rail Road stations. As the artist writes, "I will create a series of tiles tracing the history of Long Island, beginning in the Ice Age, through paintings of rocks and plant life. The next stage would show how the Native Americans interacted with plants and sea life, followed by the first Europeans, who settled in Long Island and established farms and a seafaring industry. ... The early history of Merrick describes developed grain farms with cows and sheep ... The railroad eventually became a bridging device to bring together the surrounding communities and contributed greatly to the development of contemporary Long Island." The artwork was commissioned by the MTA Arts for Transit.

(Credit: Brit Bunkley)

"Bay Shore Icons," a 1992 freize and sculpture by artist Brit Bunkley, is on the outside of the Long Island Rail Road station there. The artwork consists of cast cement relief medallions and friezes that can be seen on the exterior of the station. The cast stone elements include round medallions, symbolic of clocks, at each end of the station that are set above framed icons depicting local history and transportation. To highlight the advantages of public transportation, the artist created a frieze portraying cars in a traffic jam. The artwork is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

A detail of
(Credit: Brit Bunkley)

A detail of "Bay Shore Icons," a 1992 freize and sculpture by artist Brit Bunkley on the outside of the Long Island Rail Road station in Bay Shore. The artwork includes medallions, symbolic of clocks, at each end of the station that are set above framed icons depicting local history and transportation. Highlighting the advantages of public transportation, the artist created a frieze portraying cars in a traffic jam. The artwork was commissioned by and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

"Planting (dedicated to Long Island tree farmers)," is part of the MTA's Arts in Transit initiative. The 1995 sculptural installation by artist Alice Adams is outside the Ronkonkoma Long Island Rail Road station. The piece includes planters and trees, with paving, plantings and curved brick walls that define the space. Working with landscape architects, Adams had trees planted in rows within islands created by brick walls and placed "tree ball" concrete planters in the paved areas. The trees salute the importance of the nursery business and tree farming to Long Island's growth.

(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / Audrey C. Tiernan)

"Lost and Found: An Excavation Project," a 2005 series of cast-bronze sculptures by artist Ron Baron, is installed in the Long Island Rail Road's Hempstead station. Baron, who refers to himself as a "cultural archaeologist," culled everyday objects from streets and sidewalks, thrift shops, and garage sales and then formed his monuments of the finds. Among the Long Island-related items are an edition of Newsday featuring the Islanders winning the Stanley Cup, an NBA basketball (Julius Erving was from nearby Roosevelt), and yearbooks from Hempstead High School highlighting community events, such as Martin Luther King's address to students of the high school in 1968. The artwork was commissioned and is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program. Here, Melissa Jordan, 5, of Hempstead, plays with the art.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
A man sleeps on some bronze suitcases, part
(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / Audrey C. Tiernan)

A man sleeps on some bronze suitcases, part of "Lost and Found: An Excavation Project," a 2005 series of cast-bronze sculptures by artist Ron Baron that is installed in the Hempstead station of the Long Island Rail Road. Baron, who refers to himself as a "cultural archaeologist," turned everyday found objects into monuments. Among the Long Island-related items are an NBA basketball (Julius Erving was from nearby Roosevelt), a Jets football reflecting the team practices at Hofstra University, and yearbooks from Hempstead High School highlighting community events, such as Martin Luther King's address to students of the high school in 1968. The artwork is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

(Credit: Newsday, 2011 / Audrey C. Tiernan)

"Conductor's Watch and Key Chain" is a 1992 sculpture by artist David Saunders that decorates the walls of the Great Neck Long Island Rail Road station. The images depict the conductor's watch and chain, which the artist writes, "mimics the movement of the Long Island Rail Road's long silver trains that take commuters to and from their destinations, those speedy back and forth movements are echoed in the long swooping gestures of the sculpture's silver lines." The artwork is owned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

(Credit: Patrick Cashin)

"Bayside Story" is a 1999 sculpture by artist Ed McGowin in the Long Island Rail Road's station in Bayside, Queens. The piece consists of spiral friezes that wrap around the support columns, bearing animal and floral motifs as well as bronze reliefs that celebrate local history and culture. American Indians paddling a canoe have a central position in the work. Around them are a settler's homestead, a Revolutionary War soldier, a farm and Fort Totten, which is nearby. Boxer "Gentleman Jim" Corbett represents local heroes; a yacht and checkered flag portray local amusements. The piece was commissioned by the MTA Arts for Transit program.

Comments

Newsday.com now uses Facebook for our comment boards. Please read our guidelines and connect your Facebook account to comment.