4 LI hospitals get 'A' for patient safety

Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, which in its last

Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, which in its last two rankings scored a C, scored an A in the latest study released by The Leapfrog Group. (July 29, 2013) (Credit: Newsday / John Paraskevas)

Four Long Island hospitals scored an A in patient safety and one scored a D, in a national ranking by a medical quality and patient safety group.

The Leapfrog Group, founded 13 years ago by large employers to improve health care quality and safety, Wednesday issued its fourth hospital safety score of more than 2,600 hospitals nationwide. Reviewing data on 28 measures from national surveys from 2009 to 2012, the nonprofit assigned each hospital a score of A to F on how well it prevented errors, infections, injuries and drug mix-ups. The scores, first released in 2012, come out every six months.

Eastern Long Island Hospital in Greenport scored a D.


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For the fourth time, St. Francis Hospital in Flower Hill and John T. Mather Memorial Hospital in Port Jefferson scored an A, while St. Catherine of Siena Medical Center in Smithtown scored an A for the third time in a row. Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, which in its last two rankings scored a C, also scored an A.

Four Long Island hospitals scored a B and 13 scored a C. Overall, New York's hospitals ranked 37th; last November, they ranked 33rd among the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Paul Connor, chief executive of Eastern Long Island, said he believed the 90-bed hospital was in effect penalized for not offering complicated procedures found at larger hospitals. He said federal Medicare.gov "Hospital Compare" measures were a fair appraisal of the hospital's quality and safety.

Monica Santoro, Winthrop's chief safety officer, said the hospital's score rose because it more thoroughly completed the survey rather than because of systemic changes in procedures.

Patrick O'Shaughnessy, chief medical officer for Catholic Health Services, which includes St. Francis and St. Catherine, said: "Reports and measurements such as these are just some of the tools we use to constantly measure and improve."

To see the rankings, visit hospitalsafetyscore.org.

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