Suffolk to conduct aerial mosquito spray

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With an eye on controlling mosquito larvae, Suffolk County on Tuesday will treat area salt marshes by helicopter, using the larvicide Vectobac 12 AS.

The times are from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m., and if weather conditions interfere, the treatment by the Department of Public Works' Division of Vector Control will resume on the next suitable day, the county health department said.

Residents need take no precautions, health officials said, as the helicopter is to fly at low levels and steps will be taken "to control drift into inhabited areas," according to a release.


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"Human exposure from this operation is unlikely and the products involved have no significant human toxicity, according to an EPA assessment and Suffolk County's own risk assessment plan," the release said.

Besides being annoying, some mosquitoes through bites transmit West Nile virus to humans. Mosquitoes pick up the virus through feeding on infected birds.

Last week Suffolk activated its West Nile hotline so residents can report sightings of dead birds -- part of the county's "effort to detect and prevent" the spread of the virus, officials announced Thursday.

Last year ranked as the second-worst in U.S. West Nile virus cases since the disease was first detected in this area in 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

Nassau and Suffolk counties reported 14 human cases each last year, including one Nassau death.

For a list of marsh areas to be treated, see http://www.suffolkcountyny.gov/Departments/HealthServices/PublicHealth/PreventiveServices/PesticideApplicationNotification.aspx.

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