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Green Tea: What can it do for you?

According to the National Center for Complementary and

According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, while studies in humans have yielded mixed results, laboratory studies have shown that green tea could help protect against and/or slow the growth of some cancers. (Aug. 3, 2006) (Credit: AP)

For me, adding a cup (or two) of green tea into my daily routine was a no-brainer; it helps me to move my day forward and is a healthier alternative to many other cafeteria and coffee shop options.

Just add a drop of honey, and I’m golden.

While this soothing staple has been popular for years, many people may wonder what the benefits are of adding a cup or two into their own daily routines.


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Antioxidants, which green tea is rich in, help to protect your cells from the effects of free radicals (molecules produced when your body breaks down food, is exposed to tobacco smoke, radiation and other environmental factors).

These harmful molecules attack our bodies, damaging cells and have even been linked to heart disease, cancer and other diseases.

According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, while studies in humans have yielded mixed results, laboratory studies have shown that green tea could help protect against and/or slow the growth of some cancers.

Moreover, information on WebMD’s website cited limited studies which have shown adding green tea or its extract into a persons diet may help to combat obesity and lower “bad” cholesterol levels.

The University of Maryland Medical Center’s website also supports the theory that green tea promotes weight loss, saying, “Clinical studies suggest that green tea extract may boost metabolism and help burn fat.”

Despite some capsule and skin care products touting the addition of green tea extracts, the popular leaf is most often brewed and consumed as a beverage.

If you have considered incorporating this popular staple into your own diet, but have more questions, be sure to consult your physician.

Have any other dietary items that you either swear by or want to know more about? Let us know in the comments field below.

Tags: Meghan Glynn , green tea , health , weight loss , cancer , antioxidants

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