Increased fish intake may lead to decreased cancer risk, study shows

A new study published by the BMJ group A new study published by the BMJ group shows that eating more fish and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) leads to a decreased risk of developing breast cancer. (June 28, 2013) Photo Credit: PhotoDisc

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A new study published by the BMJ group shows that eating more fish and fatty acids leads to a 14-percent decreased risk of developing breast cancer.

The study, which included 21 independent other studies, concluded that: Higher consumption of dietary marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is associated with a lower risk of breast cancer.

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The fatty acids studied, n-3 PUFAs, are part of the omega-3 group, which cannot be synthesized by the human body; a key to why fish intake is so crucial to these conclusions. Researchers went on to say that for each 0.1 gram/day of intake was associated with a 5-percent decrease in risk.

Breast cancer, the most common type of cancer, starts forming first in the tissues of the breast. According to the National Institutes of Health, over the course of a lifetime, 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer.

Along with reducing the risk of developing breast cancer, omega-3 fatty acids are also credited with a slew of other medicinal benefits. Among them are lowering blood pressure, reducing blood clotting, boosting immunity and improving children’s learning ability, according to the Mayo Clinic’s website.

They also add that some fish are richer in omega-3s than others saying, "Fatty fish, such as salmon, herring and to a lesser extent tuna, contain the most omega-3 fatty acids and therefore the most benefit, but many types of seafood contain small amounts of omega-3 fatty acids."

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Do you already include omega-3s as part of your dietary routine? Will you start after this study’s findings? Let us know in the comments field below.

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