Tony Massoni



Retired supermarket manager

Height 5-foot-8 inches

Before Weight: 503 lbs., November 2013

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After Weight: 230 lbs., May 2015


Tony Massoni seemingly became a victim of his own kindness. The lifetime bachelor says his tendency to take care of others and not himself led to a weight problem that began 15 years ago when he started caring for his ailing father. After work each day, he would get his dad settled for the night and start late-night eating, either at McDonald's or Burger King. With the added element of being around food all day at the supermarket, the weight piled on.

There was a break of a few years between his dad's death and his mom becoming ill. Then a major house fire displaced him for six months. Massoni says: "Staying in a hotel was when I really started to decline." He became very sick and ended up getting a defibrillator. He thought, "I can't do this anymore. I put my life on hold for 15 years. I need to get my life back."

After an initial dieting blunder of limiting his eating too severely, he got on track and started eating a healthy and balanced diet and exercising. "The weight started coming off," he said. Until hitting the 300-pound mark, he kept a daily log of his eating, exercise and scale results. To date, Massoni has lost more than 270 pounds. He has in-home care for his mom, sports a 38-inch waist (down from 60 inches) and enjoys the pleasure of fitting in a diner booth. "I feel like I'm 32," says Massoni, who looks forward to dating again. He also says he couldn't have succeeded without the support of family and friends.



For breakfast, Massoni has oatmeal, a banana and black coffee. Lunch is usually a grilled chicken salad, in particular, the Burger King chicken, apple and cranberry salad. Dinner is stir-fried vegetables with a piece of chicken or fish. He drinks coconut water and snacks are McIntosh apples.


Initially, Massoni exercised by just lifting weights with his arms while sitting. As the weight came off, he increased his activity. He uses a treadmill daily and bicycles outdoors for three to four miles late at night, finding it "quiet and peaceful." He also walks on the Long Beach boardwalk.


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"It's good to help people, but never forget about yourself. You are important."