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Luke Amalfitano, 5, works on an iPad with (Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara)

Luke Amalfitano, 5, works on an iPad with his special-education teacher Vanessa Leal at the Developmental Disabilities Institute campus in Medford. (Aug. 24, 2011)

IPads give autistics communications outlet

A look at the role iPads can play in the education of people with autism. Developmental Disabilities Institute (DDI), a service provider for children and adults with autism on Long Island, received nine iPads from the EJ Autism Foundation for DDI's Young Autism Program. Officials say the devices have provided a new communication outlet for people who previously did not speak.

Luke Amalfitano, 5, works on an iPad with
(Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara)

Luke Amalfitano, 5, works on an iPad with his special-education teacher Vanessa Leal at the Developmental Disabilities Institute campus in Medford. (Aug. 24, 2011)

Vanessa Velazquez, 3, works on an iPad with
(Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara)

Vanessa Velazquez, 3, works on an iPad with Stephanie Winter, one of her special-education teachers, at the Developmental Disabilities Institute campus in Medford. (Aug. 24, 2011)

Vanessa Velazquez, 3, works on an iPad with
(Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara)

Vanessa Velazquez, 3, works on an iPad with her special-education teachers Christine Fusco, left, and Stephanie Winter at the Developmental Disabilities Institute campus in Medford. (Aug. 24, 2011)

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Vanessa Velazquez, 3, learns about colors on an
(Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara)

Vanessa Velazquez, 3, learns about colors on an iPad, and Stephanie Winter, one of her special-education teachers, helps her make the connection to real-world items such as crayons. (Aug. 24, 2011)

Luke Amalfitano, 5, works on an iPad with
(Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara)

Luke Amalfitano, 5, works on an iPad with his special-education teacher Vanessa Leal at the Developmental Disabilities Institute campus in Medford. (Aug. 24, 2011)

The touchscreen on an iPad lets Luke Amalfitano,
(Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara)

The touchscreen on an iPad lets Luke Amalfitano, 5, communicate with others. (Aug. 24, 2011)

Luke Amalfitano, 5, works on an iPad with
(Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara)

Luke Amalfitano, 5, works on an iPad with his special-education teacher Vanessa Leal at the Developmental Disabilities Institute campus in Medford. (Aug. 24, 2011)

Luke Amalfitano, 5, learns the alphabet by tracing
(Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara)

Luke Amalfitano, 5, learns the alphabet by tracing letters on the touchscreen of an iPad. (Aug. 24, 2011)

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Luke Amalfitano, 5, knows all about hands-on learning.
(Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara)

Luke Amalfitano, 5, knows all about hands-on learning. He's learning the alphabet on an iPad at the Developmental Disabilities Institute campus in Medford. (Aug. 24, 2011)

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