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Staffers at the U.S. Census Bureau in Washington (Credit: AP/Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum)

Staffers at the U.S. Census Bureau in Washington mark up a map for use in the 1940 census. The map shows approximately 147,000 enumeration districts for census-taking purposes and will ensure against overlapping activities of census takers, or enumerators, and also to avoid missing any territory.

1940 Census

Details of 132 million people who lived through the 1930s will be disclosed as the U.S. government releases the 1940 census on April 2 to the public for the first time after 72 years of privacy protection lapses.

Staffers at the U.S. Census Bureau in Washington
(Credit: AP/Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum)

Staffers at the U.S. Census Bureau in Washington mark up a map for use in the 1940 census. The map shows approximately 147,000 enumeration districts for census-taking purposes and will ensure against overlapping activities of census takers, or enumerators, and also to avoid missing any territory.

A Census Bureau staffer operates an electric tabulator
(Credit: AP/Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum)

A Census Bureau staffer operates an electric tabulator at the U.S. Census Bureau. Data for the 1940 Census was collected by hand and transferred to punched cards which were then run through the tabulating machine. The tabulating machine printed the final calculation.

William F. Arends, center, one of the more
(Credit: AP/National Archives at College Park)

William F. Arends, center, one of the more than 120,000 enumerators, returns to his dog sled after completing an enumeration near Fairbanks, Alaska for the 1940 Census. At right is musher Mike Agababa.

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An enumerator interviews actor Cesar Romero, right, to
(Credit: AP/National Archives at College Park)

An enumerator interviews actor Cesar Romero, right, to get data for the 1940 Census.

An enumerator, left, interviews a family outside a
(Credit: AP/National Archives at College Park)

An enumerator, left, interviews a family outside a rail car for the 1940 Census. The 1940 U.S. Census is the first historical federal decennial survey to be made available on the Internet initially rather than on microfilm.

William L. Austin, director of the U.S. Census
(Credit: AP)

William L. Austin, director of the U.S. Census Bureau, right, helps President Franklin D. Roosevelt fill out the 1940 Census large form at the White House in Washington. (April 2, 1940)

Tabulators in Washington record the information from the
(Credit: AP/U.S. Census Bureau)

Tabulators in Washington record the information from the more than 120,000 enumerators who gathered data for the 1940 U.S. Census.

An enumerator interviews a woman for the 1940
(Credit: AP/National Archives at College Park)

An enumerator interviews a woman for the 1940 Census. Veiled in secrecy for 72 years because of privacy protections, the 1940 U.S. Census is the first historical federal decennial survey to be made available on the Internet initially rather than on microfilm.

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This undated image provided by the National Archives
(Credit: AP)

This undated image provided by the National Archives and Records Administration shows a form used in the 1940 Census.

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