Boston to mark week from marathon bombs with silence

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Seven days after the Boston Marathon bombings, the city was bustling Monday, with runners hitting the pavement, children walking to school and enough cars clogging the streets to make the morning commute feel almost back to normal in the hours before the traumatic week would be marked with mournful silence.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick has asked residents to observe a moment of silence at 2:50 p.m. Monday, the time the first of the two bombs exploded near the finish line. Bells will toll across the city and state after the minute-long tribute to the victims.

The surviving suspect, 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, remained in serious condition in a hospital with a wound to his neck. His older brother, 26-year-old Tamerlan, was killed during a furious getaway attempt.

Many Boston residents headed back to workplaces and schools for the first time since a dramatic week came to an even more dramatic end. Traffic was heavy on major arteries into the city Monday morning, and nervous parents dropped their children off at schools, some for the first time since the attacks.

Authorities on Friday had made the unprecedented request that residents stay at home during the manhunt for suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. He was discovered that evening hiding in a boat covered by a tarp in suburban Watertown.

At the Snowden International School on Newbury Street, a high school set just a block from the bombing site, jittery parents dropped off children as teachers — some of whom had run in the race — greeted each other with hugs.

Carlotta Martin, 49, of Boston, said that leaving her kids at school has been the hardest part of getting back to normal.

"We're right in the middle of things," Martin said outside the school as her children, 17-year-old twins and a 15-year-old, walked in, glancing at the police barricades a few yards from the school's front door.

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"I'm nervous. Hopefully, this stuff is over," she continued. "I told my daughter to text me so I know everything's okay."

The city is beginning to reopen sections of the six-block site around the bombing that killed three people and wounded more than 180.

Tsarnaev remained hospitalized and unable to speak, with a gunshot wound to the throat. He was expected to be charged by federal authorities. The 19-year-old also is likely to face state charges in connection with the fatal shooting of MIT police officer Sean Collier in Cambridge, said Stephanie Guyotte, a spokeswoman for the Middlesex District Attorney's office.

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On Norfolk Street, where the brothers lived, neighbors said they thought they saw some more detectives Monday morning. But unlike Friday, the street was open.

Outside City Paint, the paint store a half-block from the brothers' home, Brian Cloutier smoked a cigarette." We'll get back to normal," he said. "Cambridge and Boston are resilient."

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