Here are the key things we know about the shootings in Dallas, Texas, that started at 8:45 p.m. there on Thursday, drawn from news conferences and media reports. 

  • Micah Johnson, 25, was identified as the sole gunman by an unnamed Texas law enforcement officer, according to AP and the New York Times. He had served from March 2009 to April 2015 in the Army Reserve and did one tour of duty in Afghanistan.
  • Three other suspects were said to be in custody but were not cooperating with police, according to The Dallas Morning News.
  • Five police officers have died as a result of the shooting. Seven other officers and two civilians were also wounded.
  • Dallas Area Rapid Transit Officer Brent Thompson, 43, was the first to be identified as one of the victims. Thompson had survived multiple tours in Iraq and had married his wife, Emily, just two weeks ago.
  • Dallas Police Officer Patrick Zamarripa was the second victim to be identified. Zamarripa was married with a two-year-old daughter and, like Thompson, had survived multiple tours in Iraq, his father, Rick, told The Washington Post.
  • Three other DART officers were wounded in the shootings, but were expected to recover, officials said in a statement. They were identified as Omar Cannon, 44, Misty McBride, 32, and Jesus Retana, 39.
  • Dallas Police Chief David Brown said Johnson was upset by the shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota. He told police he "wanted to kill white people, especially white officers," Brown said.
  • After hours of fruitless negotiation with law enforcement, Johnson was killed early Friday morning using a robot-delivered bomb, Brown said.
  • Officers at the scene said a type of rifle was used in the shootings, according to AP.
  • Johnson told police that bombs had been planted around Dallas. Officials said they swept the area and found no explosives.
  • Thursday's attack took place blocks from Dealey Plaza, where President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1963.
  • The Dallas shooting is the worst attack on law enforcement since Sept. 11, 2001.