President-elect Donald Trump on Tuesday fired back against recent national polls showing him to be the least popular incoming president in decades, calling the surveys “rigged” in a Twitter post.

“The same people who did the phony election polls, and were so wrong, are now doing approval rating polls,” Trump wrote on Twitter. “They are rigged just like before.”

Trump’s comments came as three polls released Tuesday morning showed a majority of Americans view the president-elect unfavorably and have a negative opinion of his policies.

More than half of those surveyed in a CNN/ORC poll, 53 percent, said they view Trump unfavorably, compared with 44 percent who had a favorable impression of the president-elect.

In an ABC News/Washington Post poll, 54 percent of respondents had an unfavorable opinion of Trump, compared with 40 percent with a favorable opinion.

In comparison, Barack Obama had a 79 percent favorable rating on the eve of his firstinauguration, and George W. Bush had a 62 percent favorable rating before being sworn in, according to prior ABC News/Washington Post polls.

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A Monmouth University poll found that 46 percent of Americans had a negative opinion of Trump in the days leading up to his inauguration, compared with 34 percent who viewed him favorably.

Trump took to Twitter later to say he believed his supporters saw the “big stuff.”

“With all of the jobs I am bringing back into the U.S. (even before taking office), with all of the new auto plants coming back into our country and with the massive cost reductions I have negotiated on military purchases and more, I believe the people are seeing ‘big stuff,’ ” Trump said.

Also Tuesday, Trump met with Boeing’s CEO Dennis Muilenburg for the second time since the election to discuss reducing the cost of developing a new Air Force One fleet and other military fighter jets.

Last month, Trump, who has frequently criticized the cost of defense projects, threatened to cancel the order of a new 747 Air Force One, saying on Twitter, “costs are out of control.”

Muilenburg told reporters at Trump Tower after the meeting that he and Trump had an “excellent conversation,” and he expected a new deal between the federal government and the aerospace and defense company to be reached in the “very near term.”

Trump’s inauguration planning committee announced Tuesday that he will use President Abraham Lincoln’s Bible and one that was given to him by his mother in 1955 to take the oath of office at Friday’s swearing-in ceremony.

On Capitol Hill Tuesday, Trump’s nominee for education secretary, Betsy DeVos, and his pick for interior secretary, Rep. Ryan Zinke (R-Montana), appeared for Senate confirmation hearings.

Zinke told a Senate panel he did not agree with Trump’s description of climate change as a hoax: “The climate is changing. The debate is what is that influence and what can we do.”

DeVos, a Michigan billionaire and head of a charter school advocacy group, told lawmakers that a one size-fits-all model of learning doesn’t work and that she would promote charter, magnet, religious and other alternatives to public schools, according to The Associated Press.

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But facing scathing criticism from teachers unions, DeVos also promised to be a “strong advocate for great public schools,” which provide instruction to more than 90 percent of the country’s students.