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Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, waves to Mission Control (Credit: AP )

Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, waves to Mission Control staff, family, and friends after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface in Roswell, N.M. (Oct. 14, 2012)

Felix Baumgartner's supersonic skydive

Extreme athlete Felix Baumgartner jumped from a balloon 24 miles above Earth in a death-defying free fall during which he broke the sound barrier, making him the world's first supersonic skydiver.

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows pilot Felix
(Credit: Getty Images)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria jumping out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos. (Oct. 14, 2012)

This image made from video, provided by Red
(Credit: AP )

This image made from video, provided by Red Bull Stratos, shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria as he jumps out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos. (Oct. 14, 2012)

This photo provided by Red Bull Stratos shows
(Credit: AP Photo Jay Nemeth)

This photo provided by Red Bull Stratos shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria as he jumps out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. In a giant leap from more than 24 miles up, Baumgartner shattered the sound barrier Sunday while making the highest jump ever -- a tumbling, death-defying plunge from a balloon to a safe landing in the New Mexico desert. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Jay Nemeth)

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Felix Baumgartner, left, of Austria, and Art Thompson,
(Credit: AP Photo Ross Franklin)

Felix Baumgartner, left, of Austria, and Art Thompson, technical project director, hug one another after Baumgartner successfully jumped from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Felix Baumgartner, right, of Austria, shares a laugh
(Credit: AP Photo Ross Franklin)

Felix Baumgartner, right, of Austria, shares a laugh with Col. Joe Kittinger, USAF retired, after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface, beating Kittinger's old record of 102,799 ft., Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows pilot Felix
(Credit: Getty BALAZS GARDI)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria floating down to earth before landing in the desert after successfully completing the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, New Mexico, on October 14, 2012. The Austrian daredevil became the first man to break the sound barrier in a record-shattering freefall jump from the edge of space, organizers said. The 43-year-old leapt from a capsule more than 24 miles (39 kilometers) above the Earth, reaching a speed of 706 miles per hour (1,135 km/h) before opening his red and white parachute and floating down to the New Mexico desert. AFP PHOTO/www.redbullcontentpool.com/Balazs Gardi/HO ++RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / www.redbullcontentpool.com / Balazs Gardi" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS = ONE-TIME PUBLICATION = IMAGE MUST NOT BE ALTERED OR MODIFIED++BALAZS GARDI/AFP/GettyImages

In this photo provided by Red Bull Stratos,
(Credit: AP)

In this photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria and Technical Project Director Art Thompson celebrate after successfully completing the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth. (Oct. 14, 2012)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows life support
(Credit: Getty BALAZS GARDI)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows life support engineer Mike Todd (L) of the US and pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria celebrating after successfully completing the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, New Mexico, on October 14, 2012. The Austrian daredevil became the first man to break the sound barrier in a record-shattering freefall jump from the edge of space, organizers said. The 43-year-old leapt from a capsule more than 24 miles (39 kilometers) above the Earth, reaching a speed of 706 miles per hour (1,135 km/h) before opening his red and white parachute and floating down to the New Mexico desert. AFP PHOTO/www.redbullcontentpool.com/Balazs Gardi/HO ++RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / www.redbullcontentpool.com / Balazs Gardi" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS = ONE-TIME PUBLICATION = IMAGE MUST NOT BE ALTERED OR MODIFIED++BALAZS GARDI/AFP/GettyImages

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ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE)
(Credit: Getty Handout)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE) Crew members at the mission control watch the jump of pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos on October 14, 2012 in Roswell, New Mexico. Austrian Felix Baumgartner broke the world record for the highest free fall in history after making a 23-mile ascent in capsule attached to a massive balloon. (Photo by Joerg Mitter/Red Bull Stratos via Getty Images)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, family
(Credit: AP Photo Joerg Mitter)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, family members and friends, celebrate the successful jump of pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria in Roswell, N.M. on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Joerg Mitter) MANDATORY CREDIT

In this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot
(Credit: AP Photo Joerg Mitter)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria sits in his trailer during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet, an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in free fall, which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes.(AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Joerg Mitter) MANDATORY CREDIT

As project team members cheer on Felix Baumgartner,
(Credit: AP Photo Ross Franklin)

As project team members cheer on Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, he leaps out of the space capsule, as seen on television, at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, pumps his fist to
(Credit: AP Photo Ross Franklin)

Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, pumps his fist to the crowd after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

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ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE)
(Credit: Getty Handout)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE) In this handout provided by Red Bull Stratos, a crane launches the capsule and balloon during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos October 14, 2012 in Roswell, New Mexico. Austrian Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break the world record for the highest, and fastest free fall in history by making a 23-mile ascent in capsule attached to a massive balloon. (Photo by Predrag Vuckovic/Red Bull Stratos via Getty Images)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE)
(Credit: Getty Handout)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE) In this handout provided by Red Bull Stratos, the capsule and balloon launches during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos October 14, 2012 in Roswell, New Mexico. Austrian Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break the world record for the highest, and fastest free fall in history by making a 23-mile ascent in capsule attached to a massive balloon. (Photo by Predrag Vuckovic/Red Bull Stratos via Getty Images)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE)
(Credit: Getty Handout)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE) In this handout provided by Red Bull Stratos, a crane launches the capsule and balloon during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos October 14, 2012 in Roswell, New Mexico. Austrian Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break the world record for the highest, and fastest free fall in history by making a 23-mile ascent in capsule attached to a massive balloon. (Photo by Jörg Mitter/Red Bull Stratos via Getty Images)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows , the
(Credit: Getty BALAZS GARDI)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows , the crane and balloon launching Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria in the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, New Mexico, USA on October 14, 2012. Daredevil Felix Baumgartner lifted off from the New Mexico desert on Sunday, in his second attempt to make a record-breaking jump from the edge of space.Baumgartner was being transported up to 23 miles (37 kilometers) above the Earth by an enormous balloon, before launching himself into the void, aiming to become the first human to break the sound barrier in freefall.The capsule rose into the clear blue sky, with organizers holding their breath for the first few thousand feet of ascent, as Baumgartner would not have had enough time to escape had there been a problem. ++RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / www.redbullcontentpool.com / BALAZS GARDI" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS = ONE-TIME PUBLICATION = IMAGE MUST NOT BE ALTERED OR MODIFIED++BALAZS GARDI/AFP/GettyImages

A television crew films the capsule and attached
(Credit: AP Photo Ross Franklin)

A television crew films the capsule and attached helium balloon, at top of frame, carrying Felix Baumgartner lifting off as he attempts to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet, an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in free fall, which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

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This photo provided by Red Bull Stratos shows
(Credit: AP Photo Jay Nemeth)

This photo provided by Red Bull Stratos shows pilot Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, preparing to jump from the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. In a giant leap from more than 24 miles up, Baumgartner shattered the sound barrier Sunday while making the highest jump ever -- a tumbling, death-defying plunge from a balloon to a safe landing in the New Mexico desert. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Jay Nemeth)

FILE - In this Nov. 16, 1959, file
(Credit: AP Photo Uncredited)

FILE - In this Nov. 16, 1959, file photo, provided by the U.S. Air Force, Capt. Joseph Kittinger Jr., aerospace laboratory test director, sits in the open balloon gondola after his first parachute test jump for Project Excelsior at Holloman Air Force Base in Alamogordo, N.M. In the desert surrounding Roswell, N.M., on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, Felix Baumgartner broke Kittinger's world record for the highest and fastest free fall. Baumgartner jumped from 128,100 feet, or about 24 miles, for the highest skydive -- more than four miles higher than Kittinger's jump in 1960, which was from 102,800 feet or 19.5 miles. He broke the sound barrier and more, achieving Mach 1.24. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, File)

FILE - In this Nov. 16, 1959, file
(Credit: AP Photo Uncredited)

FILE - In this Nov. 16, 1959, file photo, provided by the U.S. Air Force, Capt. Joseph Kittinger Jr. waits in the open balloon gondola, right, while the two million cubic-foot polyethylene balloons are filled with helium for the Excelsior I test jump at White Sands Missile Range, N.M. In the desert surrounding Roswell, N.M., on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, Felix Baumgartner broke Kittinger's world record for the highest and fastest free fall. Baumgartner jumped from 128,100 feet, or about 24 miles, for the highest skydive -- more than four miles higher than Kittinger's jump in 1960, which was from 102,800 feet or 19.5 miles. He broke the sound barrier and more, achieving Mach 1.24. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, File)

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 1960, file
(Credit: AP Photo Uncredited)

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 1960, file photo provided by the U.S. Air Force, Col. Joe Kittinger steps off a balloon-supported gondola at an altitude of 102,800 feet. In the desert surrounding Roswell, N.M., on Sunday, Felix Baumgartner broke Kittinger's world record for the highest and fastest free fall. Baumgartner jumped from 128,100 feet, or about 24 miles, for the highest skydive -- more than four miles higher than Kittinger's jump in 1960, which was from 102,800 feet or 19.5 miles. He broke the sound barrier and more, achieving Mach 1.24. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, File)

Felix Baumgartner, right, of Austria, gives a high-five
(Credit: AP Photo Ross Franklin)

Felix Baumgartner, right, of Austria, gives a high-five to Mike Todd, left, project life support engineer, as Col. Joe Kittinger, USAF retired and who held the previous jump ascent record at 102,799 feet, takes a drink of water, during a news conference held after Baumgartner successfully jumped from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

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Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, gestures prior to speaking
(Credit: AP Photo Ross Franklin)

Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, gestures prior to speaking with the media after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows pilot Felix
(Credit: Getty JAY NEMETH)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria jumping out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos on October 14, 2012. The Austrian daredevil became the first man to break the sound barrier in a record-shattering freefall jump from the edge of space, organizers said. The 43-year-old leapt from a capsule more than 24 miles (39 kilometers) above the Earth, reaching a speed of 706 miles per hour (1,135 km/h) before opening his red and white parachute and floating down to the New Mexico desert. AFP PHOTO/www.redbullcontentpool.com/Jay Nemeth/HO ++RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / www.redbullcontentpool.com / Jay Nemeth" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS = ONE-TIME PUBLICATION = IMAGE MUST NOT BE ALTERED OR MODIFIED++Jay Nemeth/AFP/GettyImages

In this photo provided by Red Bull Stratos,
(Credit: AP Photo Balazs Gardi)

In this photo provided by Red Bull Stratos, Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria celebrates after successfully completing the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M., Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012.�Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Balazs Gardi)

This image taken from a video monitor, provided
(Credit: AP Photo)

This image taken from a video monitor, provided by Red Bull Stratos, shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria before he jumps out of the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. In a giant leap from more than 24 miles up, Baumgartner shattered the sound barrier Sunday while making the highest jump ever -- a tumbling, death-defying plunge from a balloon to a safe landing in the New Mexico desert. (AP Photo/Red Bull Stratos, Jay Nemeth)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE)
(Credit: Getty Handout)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE) In this handout provided by Red Bull Stratos, a crane launches the capsule and balloon during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos October 14, 2012 in Roswell, New Mexico. Austrian Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break the world record for the highest, and fastest free fall in history by making a 23-mile ascent in capsule attached to a massive balloon. (Photo by Balazs Gardi/Red Bull Stratos via Getty Images)

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In this photo provided by Red Bull, crew
(Credit: AP Photo Joerg Mitter)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, crew members at the mission control watch the jump of pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria in Roswell, N.M. on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth (AP Photo/Red Bull Joerg Mitter)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE)
(Credit: Getty Handout)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE) Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria sits in his trailer during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos October 14, 2012 in Roswell, New Mexico. Austrian Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break the world record for the highest, and fastest free fall in history by making a 23-mile ascent in capsule attached to a massive balloon. (Photo by Joerg Mitter/Red Bull Stratos via Getty Images)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows family members
(Credit: Getty JOERG MITTER)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows family members and friends celebrating the successful jump of pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria aboard Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, New Mexico on October 14, 2012. Austrian daredevil Felix Baumgartner became the first man to break the sound barrier in a record-shattering freefall jump from the edge of space, organizers said. The 43-year-old leapt from a capsule more than 24 miles (39 kilometers) above the Earth, reaching a speed of 706 miles per hour (1,135 km/h) before opening his red and white parachute and floating down to the New Mexico desert. AFP PHOTO/www.redbullcontentpool.com/Joerg Mitter/HO ++RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / www.redbullcontentpool.com / Joerg Mitter" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS = ONE-TIME PUBLICATION = IMAGE MUST NOT BE ALTERED OR MODIFIED++Joerg Mitter/AFP/GettyImages

In this photo provided by Red Bull, Pilot
(Credit: AP Photo Stefan Aufschnaiter)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria jumps out from the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M., Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012.�Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Stefan Aufschnaiter)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot
(Credit: AP Photo Predrag Vuckovic)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria lands in the desert after his successful jump on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012 in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth (AP Photo/Red Bull, Predrag Vuckovic)

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In this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot
(Credit: AP Photo Predrag Vuckovic)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria lands in the desert after his successful jump on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012 in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth (AP Photo/Red Bull, Predrag Vuckovic)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows pilot Felix
(Credit: Getty Images)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria celebrating after successfully completing the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, New Mexico. (Oct. 14, 2012)

Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria celebrates after his
(Credit: AP)

Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria celebrates after his successful jump in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner came down safely in the eastern New Mexico desert about nine minutes after jumping from his capsule 128,097 feet, or roughly 24 miles, above Earth (Oct. 14, 2012)

Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, waves to Mission Control
(Credit: AP )

Felix Baumgartner, of Austria, waves to Mission Control staff, family, and friends after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface in Roswell, N.M. (Oct. 14, 2012)

Felix Baumgartner, left, of Austria, celebrates with Art
(Credit: AP Photo Ross Franklin)

Felix Baumgartner, left, of Austria, celebrates with Art Thompson, Technical Project Director, after successfully jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon at a height of just over 128,000 feet above the Earth's surface, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner landed in the eastern New Mexico desert minutes after jumping from his capsule 28,000 feet (8,534 meters), or 24 miles (38.6-kilometer), above Earth (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

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This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com crew members celebrating
(Credit: Getty BALAZS GARDI)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com crew members celebrating the successful launch during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, New Mexico, USA on October 14, 2012. Daredevil Felix Baumgartner lifted off from the New Mexico desert on Sunday, in his second attempt to make a record-breaking jump from the edge of space.Baumgartner was being transported up to 23 miles (37 kilometers) above the Earth by an enormous balloon, before launching himself into the void, aiming to become the first human to break the sound barrier in freefall.The capsule rose into the clear blue sky, with organizers holding their breath for the first few thousand feet of ascent, as Baumgartner would not have had enough time to escape had there been a problem. ++RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / www.redbullcontentpool.com / Balazs Gardi" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS = ONE-TIME PUBLICATION = IMAGE MUST NOT BE ALTERED OR MODIFIED++BALAZS GARDI/AFP/GettyImages

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE)
(Credit: Getty Handout)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE) Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria sits in his trailer during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos October 14, 2012 in Roswell, New Mexico. Austrian Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break the world record for the highest, and fastest free fall in history by making a 23-mile ascent in capsule attached to a massive balloon. (Photo by Joerg Mitter/Red Bull Stratos via Getty Images)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE)
(Credit: Getty Handout)

ROSWELL, NM - OCTOBER 14: (NO SALES/NO ARCHIVE) Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria is seen on a screen at mission control center in the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos October 14, 2012 in Roswell, New Mexico. Austrian Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break the world record for the highest, and fastest free fall in history by making a 23-mile ascent in capsule attached to a massive balloon. (Photo by Stefan Aufschnaiter/Red Bull Stratos via Getty Images)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot
(Credit: AP Photo Stefan Aufschnaiter)

In this photo provided by Red Bull, pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria is seen in a screen at mission control center in the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, N.M. on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet, an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in free fall, which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes.(AP Photo/Red Bull, Stefan Aufschnaiter)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows , a
(Credit: Getty JORG MITTER)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows , a crane launching the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, New Mexico, USA on October 14, 2012. Daredevil Felix Baumgartner lifted off from the New Mexico desert on Sunday, in his second attempt to make a record-breaking jump from the edge of space.Baumgartner was being transported up to 23 miles (37 kilometers) above the Earth by an enormous balloon, before launching himself into the void, aiming to become the first human to break the sound barrier in freefall.The capsule rose into the clear blue sky, with organizers holding their breath for the first few thousand feet of ascent, as Baumgartner would not have had enough time to escape had there been a problem. ++RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / www.redbullcontentpool.com / Jorg Mitter" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS = ONE-TIME PUBLICATION = IMAGE MUST NOT BE ALTERED OR MODIFIED++Jorg Mitter/AFP/GettyImages

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This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows ,Pilot Felix
(Credit: Getty BALAZS GARDI)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows ,Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria stepping into the capsule during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, New Mexico, USA on October 14, 2012. Baumgartner lifted off from the New Mexico desert on Sunday, in his second attempt to make a record-breaking jump from the edge of space.Baumgartner was being transported up to 23 miles (37 kilometers) above the Earth by an enormous balloon, before launching himself into the void, aiming to become the first human to break the sound barrier in freefall.The capsule rose into the clear blue sky, with organizers holding their breath for the first few thousand feet of ascent, as Baumgartner would not have had enough time to escape had there been a problem. ++RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / www.redbullcontentpool.com / BALAZS GARDI" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS = ONE-TIME PUBLICATION = IMAGE MUST NOT BE ALTERED OR MODIFIED++BALAZS GARDI/AFP/GettyImages

Felix Baumgartner's mother Ava Baumgartner, middle, watches with
(Credit: AP Photo Ross Franklin)

Felix Baumgartner's mother Ava Baumgartner, middle, watches with other family members and friends as his capsule lifts off as he attempts to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet, an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in free fall, which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows, Pilot Felix
(Credit: Getty BALAZS GARDI)

This picture provided by www.redbullcontentpool.com shows, Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria stepping out from his trailer during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, New Mexico, USA on October 14, 2012. Baumgartner lifted off from the New Mexico desert on Sunday, in his second attempt to make a record-breaking jump from the edge of space.Baumgartner was being transported up to 23 miles (37 kilometers) above the Earth by an enormous balloon, before launching himself into the void, aiming to become the first human to break the sound barrier in freefall.The capsule rose into the clear blue sky, with organizers holding their breath for the first few thousand feet of ascent, as Baumgartner would not have had enough time to escape had there been a problem. ++RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / www.redbullcontentpool.com / BALAZS GARDI" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS = ONE-TIME PUBLICATION = IMAGE MUST NOT BE ALTERED OR MODIFIED++BALAZS GARDI/AFP/GettyImages

The capsule, bottom left, and attached helium balloon
(Credit: AP Photo Ross Franklin)

The capsule, bottom left, and attached helium balloon carrying Felix Baumgartner lifts off as he attempts to break the speed of sound with his own body by jumping from a space capsule lifted by a helium balloon, Sunday, Oct. 14, 2012, in Roswell, N.M. Baumgartner plans to jump from an altitude of 120,000 feet, an altitude chosen to enable him to achieve Mach 1 in free fall, which would deliver scientific data to the aerospace community about human survival from high altitudes.(AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

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