LAS VEGAS -- Fresh off the Democrats' first presidential debate, Hillary Clinton outlined all her likely campaign themes to use against a Republican opponent at two events Wednesday.

Clinton, the favorite to be the Democratic candidate, touched on the economy, the middle class, the 2008 recession, same-sex marriage, immigration, college tuition, abortion, campaign-finance laws, unions and minority voting rights.

She harked back to good economic times when her husband, Bill Clinton, was president. For Democrats who supported President Barack Obama in 2008 instead of her, Clinton said Obama "doesn't get the credit he deserves" for getting the nation out of recession.

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And she repeatedly took shots at Republicans in general, saying the numerous candidates jockeying for that nomination "want to go back and do what didn't work before," referring to what she called a philosophy of "cut taxes" for the wealthy and "get out of corporations' way."

In criticizing congressional Republicans for what she called wanting things 100 percent their way, Clinton used self-deprecating humor in referring to her own, at times troubled, marriage.

"I'm not a hundred percent with anybody," she said, pausing for effect, then continuing, "My husband understands that," drawing laughter.

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At a nature preserve, Clinton spoke to a nighttime audience that included many African Americans and Hispanics -- key constituencies for the former secretary of state and former New York senator. In fact, performances by a mariachi band and a gospel choir opened the rally.

Earlier, she visited a union training center in suburban Henderson and picked up the endorsement of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades. A political-action committee that supports Clinton also released an ad Wednesday aimed at Hispanic audiences.

Clinton debated her opponents, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, former Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee and former Virginia Sen. Jim Webb on Tuesday at resort-casino on the Las Vegas Strip.