Norway shooting victim's dad speaks up

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OSLO -- The father of a victim of Friday's massacre said yesterday his son was full of love for people and for the outdoors -- and the young man's last words to him were "Dad, someone is shooting."

Norwegian police began releasing the names of those killed in the downtown bomb blast and the massacre at a Labor Party youth camp, an announcement likely to bring new collective grief to an already reeling nation.

Police named the first four of at least 76 people dead. Although only names, ages and hometowns were listed, it is likely to bring another shock to friends and acquaintances just learning the names of the victims. Anders Behring Breivik, 32, has confessed to the attacks, claiming he was trying to save Europe from what he says is Muslim colonization.

The first release listed three who were killed in the explosion in Oslo's government quarter and one dead in the rampage at the camp. They were Gunnar Linaker, 23, from Bardu in northern Norway, a victim of the camp massacre; and Oslo residents Tove Aashill Knutsen, 56; Hanna M. Orvik Endresen, 61; and Kai Hauge, 33.

Linaker's father told The Associated Press by telephone that Gunnar was "a calm, big teddy bear with lots of humor and lots of love." His voice weak and trembling, Linaker said he had been on the phone with his son concerning another matter when the shooting started. "He said to me: 'Dad, dad, someone is shooting,' and then he hung up." That was the last he heard from his son.

Gunnar Linaker was among the wounded taken to a nearby hospital, where he died on Saturday. His 17-year-old sister also was at the camp, but somehow survived, he said.

Breivik has confessed to the rampage, but he has pleaded not guilty to the terrorism charges he faces. He sees himself as "some kind of savior" and is probably insane, his attorney said Tuesday, though the lawyer said he did not know whether he would use an insanity defense.

Geir Lippestad told The Associated Press in an interview that his client is unaware of the impact of the attacks and asked him how many people he had killed. Lippestad said he did not answer the question.

In an exclusive AP interview, Breivik's former stepmother said she had never seen any violent or anti-Muslim behavior from him, even in recent months.

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