Police: Tamerlan Tsarnaev buried in undisclosed tomb

Tamerlan Tsarnaev smiles after accepting the trophy for

Tamerlan Tsarnaev smiles after accepting the trophy for winning the 2010 New England Golden Gloves Championship in Lowell, Mass. Tsarnaev, 26, was identified by authorities as one of the Boston bombings suspects. (Credit: AP, 2010)

The body of suspected Boston Marathon bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev has been buried at an undisclosed location outside Worcester, police of the central Massachusetts city said Thursday.

In a news release, Worcester police said a "courageous and compassionate" person came forward to "provide the assistance needed to properly bury the deceased. His body is no longer in the City of Worcester and is now entombed."

Graham Putnam & Mahoney Funeral Parlors had been trying since Friday to find a cemetery that would accept the body.


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According to The Associated Press, funeral director Peter Stefan said he could not find a community willing to take the body, including Cambridge, where the family had lived for a decade.

The body was in the custody of Tsarnaev's uncle, Ruslan Tsarni, who came from Montgomery Village, Md., to handle arrangements after Tsarnaev's widow, Katherine Russell, asked to have his body released to her in-laws.

Police did not disclose where the body was buried and said that "there is no further information at this time."

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick said Thursday he was glad the Tsarnaev family found a burial location.

He called the weeklong drama over where to bury Tsarnaev a circus, and said he hopes attention can now return to caring for the victims of the bombing, which killed three people and injured more than 260 on April 15.

In Russia, Tsarnaev's mother claimed authorities wouldn't allow her son's body into the country for burial in her native Dagestan, but Russian officials would not comment on that contention.

An expert in U.S. burial law said the resistance to Tsarnaev's burial was unprecedented in a country that has always found a way to put to rest its notorious killers, from Lee Harvey Oswald to Adam Lanza, who gunned down 20 children and six educators at a Newtown, Conn., elementary school in December.

With AP

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