Let Mayor Bloomberg run for office again
Term limits have not served us well. Politicians are encouraged to pillage the treasury to send money back to their districts in order to build name recognition for higher office.

Long-term planning is discouraged - after all, these guys won’t be around to cut the ribbon if they build a new bridge or rehabilitate a major building. Mayoral oversight of our schools is a delicate work-in-progress that requires continuity of government to avoid returning to chaotic and failed past practices.

By giving New Yorkers the opportunity to decide for ourselves whether we want Bloomberg or some other person to manage our collapsing city budget, all of us will be better off in the end.

--Joseph Chiarella, Douglaston

Term limits: The people need to speak
If the City Council doesn’t want blood on its hands, they should send this decision - already made by the people - back to the people.

My opinion of the mayor has not been changed; he is an elitist who is used to buying whatever he wants and, judging from his comments after the Westside Stadium defeat, doesn’t handle rejection well. Bloomberg needs to remember no one is indispensible, and we could get anyone to raise real estate taxes as he did after 9/11.

--David DiBello, Lakewood N.J.

This is not up to the City Council
Seven years ago, many discussed whether Giuliani’s mayoral term should be extended because of 9/11, but the city decided that the law is the law, and it should not be changed.

Now the City Council will debate whether term limits should be extended to three terms, even though the city overwhelmingly voted no to a referendum related to this issue in 1996. The council has no business passing a law to change the will of the people.

If the people strongly believe that this law needs to be changed, they can vote on this, again, through a referendum.

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--Flora Huang, Manhattan