A supervisory agent and a telecommunications specialist for the Drug Enforcement Administration were arrested Wednesday on charges they were running a strip club in New Jersey on the sly.

A criminal complaint unsealed in federal court in New York City identifies David Polos and Glen Glover as part owners of Twins Plus Go-Go Lounge in South Hackensack. The club offers scantily clad and sometimes topless dancers - most of them workers from Brazil or Russia in the country illegally - and private rooms for lap dances, according to the complaint.

The men, who worked at the DEA's Manhattan headquarters, surrendered to face charges they falsified national security forms and lied during background-check interviews by failing to disclose outside employment that could put them "in proximity to crime" and at risk for getting blackmailed. They are due in court later Wednesday.

Polos, 51, and Glover, 45, "had important and sensitive law enforcement jobs with the DEA," U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement. "As alleged in the Complaint, they also had other secret jobs, which they concealed from DEA in order to maintain their national security clearance, betraying the oaths they had taken and creating needless risk for the agency they worked for."

According to the complaint, Glover and Polos often moonlighted as supervisors at the club. Polos, it says, "used his status as a law enforcement officer to facilitate the club's operations, including displaying his firearm in connection with a dispute among those operating the club."

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An unidentified dancer from Brazil told investigators that Polos once loaned her money to bail herself out of jail following an arrest on charges she was involved in an altercation with a local police officer outside the club.

Evidence includes text messages from the defendants' work cellphones to managers at the club, court papers say.

In one 2011 text, Glover wrote, "I'm coming with two state troopers. They don't know I own the bar," the papers say. A manager responded by saying he would alert another employee.

Polos supervised the New York Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Strike Force until last month. His lawyer did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

Glover's attorney, Cathy Fleming, said she's confident her client will be vindicated.