Desalination Water Treatment Plant project in Haverstraw

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In 2010, United Water set up a pilot desalination water treatment plant. The controversial proposal, if approved, would be the first water treatment facility in the state to remove salt from the Hudson River water and supply it to homes.

The proposed intake site for the Haverstraw Water
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

The proposed intake site for the Haverstraw Water Supply Project is near the United States Gypsum Co.'s conveyor, which stretches into the Hudson River near the Haverstraw Marina. (May 23, 2012)

Part of the proposed site for the Haverstraw
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

Part of the proposed site for the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's treatment facility is located where Carol Avenue ends in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

The proposed intake site for the Haverstraw Water
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

The proposed intake site for the Haverstraw Water Supply Project is near the United States Gypsum Co.'s conveyor, which stretches into the Hudson River near the Haverstraw Marina. (May 23, 2012)

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From left, senior technical specialist Frank Robinson of
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

From left, senior technical specialist Frank Robinson of Smithtown, and environmental engineer Kathryn Rodriguez of the Bronx work in the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

Environmental engineer Kathryn Rodriguez of the Bronx works
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

Environmental engineer Kathryn Rodriguez of the Bronx works in the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

Senior technical specialist Frank Robinson of Smithtown works
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

Senior technical specialist Frank Robinson of Smithtown works in the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

Equipment involved in the process of treating and
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

Equipment involved in the process of treating and desalinating drinking water drawn from the Hudson River is on display and open to public touring in the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

Equipment involved in the process of treating and
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

Equipment involved in the process of treating and desalinating drinking water drawn from the Hudson River is on display and open to public touring at the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

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Project manager Sameet Master explains the process by
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

Project manager Sameet Master explains the process by which drinking water from the Hudson River would be treated and desalinated in the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

This process flow diagram illustrates the process of
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

This process flow diagram illustrates the process of treating and desalinating drinking water drawn from the Hudson River in the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

This map shows the proposed sites for water
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

This map shows the proposed sites for water intake from the Hudson River, the path that pipes will follow and where the water treatment plant would be located. It is on display at the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

Project manager Sameet Master stands near a mesh
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

Project manager Sameet Master stands near a mesh screen, on display at the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. The screen would be submerged in the Hudson to draw brackish water that would be desalinated and supplied as drinking water. Environmentalists are concerned about this equipment. (May 23, 2012)

Environmentalists are concerned about mesh screens that would
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

Environmentalists are concerned about mesh screens that would be submerged in the Hudson River to draw in brackish water that would then be desalinated and supplied as drinking water. The mesh screen is on display at the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

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Michael Pointing, general manager of United Water, at
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

Michael Pointing, general manager of United Water, at the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. Seen behind him is the machinery that desalinates brackish water from the Hudson River. (May 23, 2012)

Equipment involved in the process of treating and
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

Equipment involved in the process of treating and desalinating drinking water drawn from the Hudson River is on display and open to public touring in the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

Michael Pointing, general manager of United Water, explains
(Credit: Angela Gaul)

Michael Pointing, general manager of United Water, explains the process by which drinking water from the Hudson River would be treated and desalinated in the Haverstraw Water Supply Project's pilot test facility in West Haverstraw. (May 23, 2012)

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