Jennifer Rosoff, NYC woman, killed in 17-story fall from NYC balcony

Jennifer Rosoff, 35, seen in an undated photo,

Jennifer Rosoff, 35, seen in an undated photo, plunged to her death after the railing on her 17th-floor Manhattan balcony gave way, police said. She went outside for a cigarette around 12:50 a.m. when she either sat on the railing or leaned on it. Photo Credit: Pinterest

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A Manhattan advertising executive who graduated from Walt Whitman High School in Huntington Station plunged to her death early Thursday after the railing of her 17th-floor apartment balcony gave way, police said.

Jennifer Rosoff, 35, was with a date on the balcony when she either sat or leaned on the railing, police said.

She was pronounced dead at the scene and police said no foul play is suspected, according to The Associated Press.

The gray brick high-rise building at 400 E. 57th St. on Manhattan's Upper East Side was built before World War II, the AP said. Only the higher-floor corner apartments have balconies, and the Department of Buildings ordered them off limits until further inspections are conducted.

Those who knew and worked with Rosoff described her Thursday as a generous, talented and driven professional who made friends wherever she went.

"She was just unbelievably helpful," said Danny Bellish, 26, a sales manager for Saveur, a food magazine.

Online records show Rosoff lived in Baldwin, Melville, Northport and Huntington Station, where she graduated from Walt Whitman High School in 1996, before getting a bachelor's degree in communications from Tulane University.

She worked in sales for several major media organizations.

In April, she started as the sales director at TripleLift, an online advertising firm in Manhattan.

"The entire company is distraught," TripleLift chief executive Eric Berry said in a statement. "Her tremendous energy and humor brought so much joy."

A man who answered the phone at a relative's home declined to comment, and other family members did not return calls or could not be reached.

Bellish said Rosoff served as a mentor in 2009 when he was an assistant print buyer wanting to change careers and she worked as an account manager at Cosmopolitan.

"I turned to Jennifer at every single step of my career," Bellish said. "She was always ahead of the curve."

With Ellen Yan

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