A jury in Manhattan federal court on Friday took just 90 minutes to rule in favor of New York Jets star receiver Brandon Marshall in a lawsuit brought by a California woman who claimed he punched her outside of a nightclub in 2012.

Most jurors declined to comment, but one man who declined to give his name told reporters that the blurry security video that Christin Myles used as her key evidence was too ambiguous to find in her favor.

“The video was grainy,” the juror said. “There was an argument that he may or may not have thrown a punch, but there was no evidence that the punch is actually what injured her.”

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The juror also told reporters the panel was unimpressed by Myles’ claim that she suffered severe pain and suffering from Marshall, and that punitive damages were appropriate.

“Either way, guilty or not, she would not have gotten any damages,” he said.

The lawsuit stemmed from a fracas inside the VIP lounge of the nightclub that involved both Myles’ boyfriend and Marshall’s best friend, former Jacksonville Jaguar receiver Michael Sims-Walker, and left Marshall’s wife, Michi, bleeding from a thrown bottle.

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When it spilled outside, Marshall testified, he was fearful because he and Sims-Walker were outnumbered. Myles, who said she was angry because her birthday party had been ruined, approached and took a wild swing at Sims-Walker.

Security video showed Marshall thrusting his arm forward in her direction, but at the point where it might have hit her it was blurry and obscured. Marshall said he feared for his life from oncoming attackers and was using his arm for balance as he tried to run.

Marshall attended every day of the trial, but was not present for the reading of the verdict. Myles put her head in her hands, appearing despondent.

Lawyers for Marshall, who makes millions, asked U.S. District Judge George Daniels to order court costs against Myles, an administrative worker. The judge deferred ruling.

Afterward Myles’ lawyer Josh Moskovitz declined to comment. Marshall’s lawyer Harvey Steinberg of Denver, where Marshall used to play, applauded the vindication.

“We’re happy it only took an hour,” Steinberg said. “Brandon bears no ill will toward Ms. Myles. He knew he never touched her, and he wasn’t going to pay a penny because he knew he did nothing wrong.”

Although Marshall wasn’t present in court for the verdict, shortly afterward a message was posted on his Twitter account indicating that he was on a plane headed to Chicago, and a picture and quote from Mother Teresa appeared on his bmarshall Instagram account.

“People are often unreasonable and self centered,” the quote began. “Forgive them anyway.”