Local subway service on E and F lines resumes, MTA says

An MTA worker emerges from an access point

An MTA worker emerges from an access point near the 65th and Broadway station in Woodside on Saturday, May 3, 2014. An F train derailed Friday, injuring 19 people. (Credit: Steven Sunshine)

The last of the F train cars that derailed Friday in Queens, injuring 19, were removed overnight Saturday and local service on both the F and E trains was restored early Sunday, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority said.

The E and F trains will run local in Queens, resuming normal schedules in Manhattan, until crews complete repairs to the broken tracks, the MTA said. The agency said it aims to fully restore express service on the impacted lines by 5 a.m. Monday -- before rush hour.

"The challenge here was getting a derailed train out of the way," said Adam Lisberg, the MTA's chief spokesman.

Investigators were looking into a fractured rail that was manufactured in November and installed just two months before the derailment, the MTA said.

"At this point it becomes a scientific investigation to look at everything that happened to that rail in the weeks since it was installed and also look at everything about the train car that went over it," Lisberg said.

The derailed train cars were taken to the Jamaica rail yard, where they will be examined, MTA spokeswoman Amanda Kwan said Sunday.

The eight-car train derailed Friday morning in Woodside, near the 65th Street station. The train left the tracks but did not fall over. About 1,000 passengers were evacuated and 19 were hurt with nonlife-threatening injuries.

State Department of Transportation spokesman Beau Duffy Sunday confirmed the state Public Transportation Safety Board is also investigating the derailment.

Kwan said Sunday that investigators were still working to determine the cause of the derailment, and both the MTA and the state's Public Transportation Safety Board were involved.

"The age of the tracks is not a factor. Speed is not a factor," she said. "There was a broken rail. We do not know if that's the cause, but we need to find out how and why it was broken."With Dan Rivoli

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