Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled his $84.7 billion budget Tuesday amid what he called the “deep uncertainty” of Donald Trump’s presidency.

Speaking Tuesday at City Hall, de Blasio identified five city services that could be affected by policies of the Republican Trump administration: police, because of sanctuary city protections for undocumented immigrants; public hospitals; education; environmental protection; and public housing.

But de Blasio said his proposed budget for the new fiscal year — which would increase spending by $1.2 billion over this year — “very consciously” avoids assuming that Trump will slash spending.

The city has no plans to compensate for federal funding cuts if they occur, de Blasio said. He noted that Trump has offered sometimes conflicting policy proposals, and that there are “not Trump-specific things” in his budget.

Key initiatives in the de Blasio spending plan include:

  • $10.4 million for bullet-resistant windows for every NYPD patrol vehicle, to be installed within a year.
  • $275 million for a Rodman’s Neck training facility for the NYPD.
  • $147 million to repave 1,300 lane miles of roadway.
  • And $303 million for a critical water tunnel serving Brooklyn and Queens.

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De Blasio said he also was instructing the NYPD to step up patrols for speeding drivers, as part of his Vision Zero traffic-safety plan.

“You’re going to see more summonses for speeding, all over the city,” he said. Individual precinct and borough commanders will determine patrol patterns, he said.

De Blasio said his administration is stocking away about $1 billion in reserves, and directing municipal agencies to find a total of $500 million in savings within about three months, when the mayor’s executive budget proposal is due. The 2018 fiscal year begins July 1.

The motto of the budget presentation was “New York Stands Strong” — de Blasio’s declaration that he would not back down from criticizing Trump. Soon after Trump’s victory, de Blasio vowed to take on Trump’s promises to deport people in the country illegally, create a Muslim registry and gut Obamacare.

Trump allies also want to cut funding for so-called sanctuary cities such as New York, which doesn’t cooperate with federal immigration authorities by detaining arrestees whose immigration status is in question.

Councilwoman Julissa Ferreras-Copeland (D-Queens), chairwoman of the committee that will hold formal hearings later this year into the budget, said she’d like to see more Trump-related contingencies.

But she noted that the stock market has risen since Trump’s election and he has proposed massive infrastructure spending, both of which would benefit New York City’s coffers.

A call to the White House seeking comment was not immediately returned.