New York City won't pursue a bid to host the Summer Olympics in 2024, the de Blasio administration said Wednesday.

Officials ruled out the idea, proposed earlier this month by a top aide to the mayor's predecessor, after concluding that the disadvantages outweighed the benefits.

Dan Doctoroff -- a onetime deputy mayor during the Bloomberg era, the chief booster of its failed 2012 Olympics push, and now an executive of Bloomberg's namesake company -- had suggested a new try.

In a proposal made public two weeks ago to the state, Doctoroff argued that an Olympics would spur economic development and jolt needed infrastructure improvements. Mayor Bill de Blasio said at the time that the benefits to Olympics host cities have "been a mixed bag" and that the "bar is high."

De Blasio spokesman Phil Walzak confirmed the push for 2024 is dead.

Doctoroff's counterpart under de Blasio, Deputy Mayor for Housing and Economic Development Alicia Glen, told The Wall Street Journal that pursuing the Olympics for 2024 "doesn't make sense."

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"I think when you actually ask the average New Yorker on the street whether or not the city should be focusing its planning effort, its infrastructure effort, its policing, its transportation, around an event that will happen for three weeks in the summer 10 years from now, versus getting down to business with all of the challenges and opportunities we have in front of us right now, I'm pretty sure that the vast majority of New Yorkers would say, 'I'd rather watch it on my big-screen TV at home,' " she told the Journal.

Officials worried that pursuing games would detract from de Blasio's agenda, which includes 200,000 housing units priced at below-market rates.

Doctoroff could not be reached for comment.