New York City’s 2,100 traffic-enforcement agents — the NYPD employees who issue parking tickets and direct traffic — are set to receive a 10 percent raise under a contract proposal announced Tuesday.

The proposal, which covers a little more than seven years, is retroactive to 2010, when the previous contract expired. The $64.4 million contract cost is expected to be offset by health care savings that could bring the net cost down to $20.3 million, according to the city.

“Our traffic enforcement agents keep our roads moving and our pedestrians, bikers and drivers safe. This agreement means they’ll get the fair wages they deserve, while protecting New York City’s fiscal health,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said in a statement about the deal, negotiated with the agents’ union, the Communications Workers of America, Local 1182.

Average pay for summons-issuing agents, called Level 1s, will reach $30,706 from $29,217 now, and traffic-directing agents, Level 2s, will reach $38,625 from $36,015, said union president Syed Rahim.

He said the deal for the first time creates a seniority system that rewards years of service.

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“They did not differentiate senior and junior” before, he said.

His members will vote Feb. 10. Assuming agents ratify the contract, 95 percent of the municipal unionized workforce will have reached deals with the city. When de Blasio took the mayoralty in January 2014, all such contracts had expired.

De Blasio’s preliminary budget, released last week, would fund 327 new traffic-enforcement agents.