The NYPD on Thursday backed City Council legislation to criminalize “revenge porn” — a bill that goes further than state law.

The city legislation would prohibit dissemination of sexually explicit photographs and videos without permission, regardless of whether the featured person initially gave consent. The state law, enacted in 2014, covers only material photographed or recorded without the depicted person’s permission.

Revenge porn cases are currently difficult to prosecute because of “legal gaps” that the bill helps address, Oleg Chernyavsky, the NYPD’s director of legislative affairs, told the council’s public safety committee.

Sgt. Frank Maiello, of the NYPD’s domestic violence unit, pointed to cases that include a man who texted naked pictures of his ex-wife to the couple’s sons, and men threatening to post naked pictures of their former girlfriends online.

A violator of the proposed law could be jailed for up to a year and fined as much as $1,000.

The sponsors of the measure, council members Rory Lancman (D-Queens) and Dan Garodnick (D-Manhattan), have sought to shield it from First Amendment scrutiny by adding exceptions for matters of public interest and requiring that the violator intended to cause economic, emotional or physical harm.

advertisement | advertise on newsday

But free speech expert Floyd Abrams said it’s a “close call” on whether the law would pass muster on constitutional grounds if challenged.

“There is a serious First Amendment argument that, for better or worse, this is truthful speech obtained legally,” said Abrams, a Manhattan lawyer. “Yet there is a very strong movement toward protecting people whose lives may be significantly harmed if pictures that were meant for one person wind up going viral on the internet.”