WASHINGTON -- The 2016 Republican nomination contest is as unsettled as ever, with no candidate receiving more than 11 percent support and seven candidates all within three points of one another, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll.

Meanwhile, Hillary Rodham Clinton continues to dominate the Democratic nomination contest. But voter views of her personal attributes continue to erode in the wake of stories about fundraising practices at the Clinton Foundation and her use of a personal email server while at the State Department.

Clinton's favorability ratings are the lowest in a Post-ABC poll since April 2008, during her first run for president. Today, 41 percent of Americans say she is honest and trustworthy, compared with 52 percent who say she is not.

With the first Republican debate two months away and criteria for participation determined by standing in national polls, the GOP's quandary in having such a large field becomes increasingly clear. Both Fox News and CNN, which will host the first two debates, have said they will pick the top 10 candidates based on an average of national polls.

At this point, the Post-ABC poll finds the Republican field is largely a muddled mass.

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Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin and Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky top the list at 11 percent each among Republicans and GOP-leaning independent registered voters. Former Florida governor Jeb Bush and Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida are at 10 percent each. All others among the 16 candidates tested are in single digits.

The margin of error is plus or minus 6 percentage points.

In the last Post-ABC survey of the Republican field in late March, Bush stood at 21 percent and held a lead of eight points over his nearest rival, Walker. Since then, as more candidates have formally launched campaigns, Bush's support has been cut in half.

The next six in order are former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee, former surgeon Ben Carson, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, former senator Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania and businessman Donald Trump.

The poll was conducted by telephone Thursday through Sunday among a random national sample of 1,001 adults.