Cuomo releases tax returns, book advance figures

Gov. Andrew Cuomo highlights the New York State

Gov. Andrew Cuomo highlights the New York State Budget at CenterState CEO's Annual Meeting in Syracuse on Monday, April 14, 2014. Photo Credit: Office of the Governor / Darren McGee

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ALBANY -- Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has made $188,333 so far, or more than his state salary, to write a book about being governor.

The fee is the first installment on his advance from HarperCollins. The advance was reported in Cuomo's 2013 tax returns shown to reporters briefly Tuesday as part of an Albany tradition for statewide officials. Cuomo spokesman Matt Wing wouldn't release how much Cuomo is expected to make from the book. "All Things Possible: Setbacks and Success in Politics and Life" is expected to be released in August.

Cuomo, a Democrat, is running for re-election against Republican Rob Astorino, the Westchester County executive.

Cuomo didn't keep all of the advance, which was part of his total income of $358,448 last year. He reported he paid $35,127 for representation, presumably that of an agent, and legal fees.

Cuomo also paid $96,302 in federal income taxes and $24,907 in state income taxes. He reports paying no property taxes for the Westchester home he lives in with Sandra Lee, the Food Network host. The home is in Lee's name.

Cuomo was paid $175,000 as governor, a level set in law, and continued to carry part of about $25,000 in losses in securities dating back to 2012. He contributed $16,000 to charity, all to Housing Enterprise for the Less Privileged, which he founded in 1986.

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Lt. Gov. Robert Duffy reported $191,231 in income for himself and his wife, Barbara, who has long worked in the human resources field. Duffy also collected $70,255 in pension from his earlier career in the Rochester Police Department, where he was chief.

Duffy and his wife paid $48,565 in federal income taxes, $10,815 in state income taxes and $9,919 in real estate taxes.

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