Hundreds of employees working at Waldbaum's and Pathmark stores owned by the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. have received layoff notices, a union official and workers said.

Earlier this week, employees were told that the last day of work for most workers will be Nov. 12. Minimal "front end" staff such as cashiers will work until the closing of some stores scheduled for the week before Thanksgiving.

A spokeswoman for Mineola-based UFCW Local 338, which represents employees at Waldbaum's stores on Long Island, said the workers received layoff notices. An A&P spokeswoman declined to comment on the notices.

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More than 5,000 employees at 51 Long Island stores were notified during the summer that they were at risk of losing their jobs between late October and Thanksgiving.

Some of those workers have since been hired by other supermarkets, including 1,100 employed by Stop & Shop. Others may be hired by Best Market, Key Food, King Kullen, Foodtown and ShopRite at Long Island stores acquired from A&P.

So far, 33 Long Island A&P stores have been bought or bid on, and five were closed in October, while 13 other stores remain unsold.

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John Candia, 28, of East Meadow, a part-time customer service supervisor at the Waldbaum's in Jericho, said he found out Tuesday his store will be closing Nov. 21.

"The atmosphere at the store is horrible," said Candia, an LIU Post graduate who has worked for the chain since 2007. "It's really difficult to come to work. The shelves are empty, and people keep asking when we're going to close, which is so degrading."

On Monday the bankruptcy judge in White Plains overseeing A&P's Chapter 11 filing issued an interim order authorizing A&P to deny union workers the right to participate in the employee-transfer practice referred to as bumping, which allows a more senior employee to take the place of an employee with less seniority.

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The judge also ordered that union workers receive about 54 percent of their contractual severance pay, more than A&P originally proposed.