Arctic air to drop LI temps again this week

Jose Rubio of Central Islip looks over at

Jose Rubio of Central Islip looks over at frozen Great South Bay from Heckscher State Park in East Islip. Freezing temperatures are expected this week with highs only in the low 20's Tuesday and Wednesday. (jan. 26, 2014) (Credit: James Carbone)

Long Island will see some single-digit temperatures this week, courtesy of yet another Arctic air mass that has been pummeling the region this winter.

Sunday started out clear with highs in the mid-20s but scattered flurries were forecast to begin in the late afternoon and end by 9 p.m., according to the National Weather Service.

Lows on Sunday are predicted to be in the low to mid-20s, said Joey Picca, a meteorologist with the service.


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A slight chance of rain or snow comes on Monday, with highs in the mid- to upper 30s, "fairly close to normal," Picca said.

But the relative warmth is only a prelude to the return of some seriously cold weather for the rest of the week.

"We've been right in the firing line for these cold arctic air masses," he said.

Monday night's skies will become clear as low temperatures drop into the low to midteens, Picca said.

Tuesday will remain dry, but the high will only reach into the upper teens. Lows on Tuesday will be in the upper single digits.

Wednesday will also stay dry, with highs in the low 20s and lows in the lower to midteens.

Thursday will warm up slightly, with highs around 30, Picca said. A chance of snow showers comes Thursday night, with lows in the low to mid-20s.

Friday continues to warm, with highs in the mid-30s and lows in the low to mid-20s.

Picca said the repeated Arctic blasts have been helped along by the jet stream, driving frigid air from the polar region across the Midwest, the Great Lakes and to the Northeast.

He also said the forecast shows February looks to bring a higher than normal chance for storms.

"Whether that is rain, snow or something in between -- that remains to be seen," Picca said.

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