Flash-flood watch as Andrea brushes LI

A satellite image shows rain hitting Long Island,

A satellite image shows rain hitting Long Island, taken at 12:50 a.m. (June 7, 2013) (Credit: Weather Underground)

With "widespread heavy rainfall" expected from the remnants of Tropical Storm Andrea, a flash-flood watch has been issued for Long Island, in effect from 6 a.m. Friday to 2 p.m. Saturday, the National Weather Service said.

The heaviest rainfall is expected this afternoon into early Saturday, forecasters said.

At times, rainfall rates could reach 1 to 2 inches an hour, the service said, with prime concern for the possible flooding of urban and poor drainage areas, along with small streams.


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Still, as the remnants of Andrea are expected to pass to the southeast of Long Island, strong gusting winds from the storm system will likely remain offshore, forecasters said, and coastal flooding "is not anticipated" at this time.

At most, "it may get a little breezy" Friday, with possible gusts of 20 to 25 mph Friday night into Saturday morning, said David Stark, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Upton.

In all, 3 to 4 inches of rain are forecast into early Saturday, with possible heavier rain bands leading to higher amounts in certain spots, Stark said.

Expect continued light to moderate rain Friday, with the heaviest rainfall -- the effects of Andrea -- expected to start this afternoon, making for an unpleasant evening commute, and lasting through early Saturday morning, said Ashley Sears, also a meteorologist in Upton.

There will be a 50 percent chance of rain by 6 a.m. Saturday, dropping to 30 percent at 9 a.m., Stark said. "Things will start to taper off," Stark said. "We're not going to see widespread soaking rain" Saturday.

Andrea, the first named storm of the Atlantic season, hit landfall Thursday in Dixie County, Fla. at 5:40 p.m.

Parts of Florida, Georgia and South Carolina were expected to be doused with 3 to 6 inches of rain, the center said. Amounts of 2 to 4 inches were forecast as the storm makes its way up the coast from North Carolina to Maine.

Clearing skies were forecast for Sunday, but showers are possible again on Monday, the weather service said.

With Bill Mason

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