Trump's first 100 days: Voices from around the world weigh in

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Donald Trump’s stunning election victory brought shocked concern in many parts of the world and cheers in others. One uncontroversial certainty was that it would cause reverberations around the globe.

Trump campaigned on an "America First" platform, but has found himself as president drawn into thorny geopolitical complexities aplenty in the first 100 days of his administration. Associated Press journalists in North Korea, Syria, Iran, Somalia, Israel, the West Bank, Russia, Germany and Mexico have gauged the global temperature by asking people the five questions below.

Yuliya Konyakhina, Moscow

In this April 20, 2017, image from video,
(Credit: AP/Vladimir Kondrashov)

Q: Do you feel more secure under a Trump presidency, or in danger?

A: I have a feeling that the world became more dangerous in general, not because Trump got elected, but in general it (the world) became more dangerous. When I go down to a metro I have sort of thoughts that something bad can happen.

Shahrzad Ebrahimi, Tehran, Iran

In this April 22, 2017 photo, Shahrzad Ebrahimi,
(Credit: AP/Ebrahim Noroozi)

Q: Do you feel more secure under a Trump presidency, or in danger?

A: (The world) is 100 percent a more dangerous place. The U.S. threats to the world had been lessened during (Barack) Obama's presidency and policies of that country were based on moving toward peace for at least eight years. But as soon as Trump took office, demonstrations began against him and the situations in Syria, Palestine, bombings, military and war threats all got worse. The more he sticks with his current policies, the more insecure and non-peaceful the world, especially the Middle East, will become. As you can see, now he is exchanging verbal blows with North Korea. Sometimes one can assume that this situation can even trigger a third world war.

Rustam Magamedov, Moscow

In this April 21, 2017, image made from
(Credit: AP/Vladimir Kondrashov)

Q: Do you feel more secure under a Trump presidency, or in danger?

A: (Trump is) agent provocateur, but in reality, he is just a good showman, as they say in the U.S. The fact that he became a president is rather scary, because he can start a war. It seems like that he is already moving toward the Korean borders. I think it is dangerous, first of all for Russia, because as a president and politician he is a bad person, a bad politician who has little understanding of politics.

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Dan Mirkin, Tel Aviv, Israel

In this April 23, 2017, photo, Dan Mirkin
(Credit: AP/Tsafrir Abayov)

Q: Do you feel more secure under a Trump presidency, or in danger?

A: Yeah, well maybe a little bit more dangerous. But I think that the steps that he took should have been taken a long time ago. And if it became more dangerous then it's not only because of Trump. Although, he has other drawbacks.

Q: Has Trump changed your views about America?

A: I think that the U.S. remains the beacon of democracy because the U.S. itself is much more than its president. The president can be less or more of a beacon. But, America is a beacon.

Raya Sauerbrun, Tel Aviv, Israel

In this April 23, 2017, photo, Raya Sauerbrun
(Credit: AP/Tsafrir Abayov)

Q: Is the Trump administration more bark than bite?

A: If it's barking or if it's doing, at least it shows that it's doing something. If it will sustain for a long time, we don't know.

Yadollah Sobhani, Tehran, Iran

In this April 22, 2017, photo, Yadollah Sobhani,
(Credit: AP/Ebrahim Noroozi)

Q: Is the Trump administration more bark than bite?

A: Trump comes out with a lot of hype at first but eventually backs down from some of his stances on issues such as Russia, Middle East, Syria and so on. His inconsistent actions have proven that his bark is worse than his bite and he should not be taken very seriously.

Q: What has surprised you about President Trump?

A: What shocked me most from Trump was a sudden shift in his policies toward Russia from a friendly position to a clash. I did not expect such instability in a politician's behavior.

Diane Lallouz, Tel Aviv, Israel

In this April 23, 2017, photo, Diana Lallouz
(Credit: AP/Tsafrir Abayov)

Q: Is the Trump administration more bark than bite?

A: It's true that Donald Trump has a loud bark and you can say it's more bark than bite. But, not really. It's enough that he takes a few actions as opposed to not doing anything. He talks a lot, sometimes way too much and right off the sleeve without actually thinking about it and that may be a problem. But, at least the world knows that Donald Trump is going to take action when required.

Q: Are we now living in a ‘post-truth’ world?

I don't think that we're existing in a post-truth world and I don't think that the way we consume information has anything to do with Trump. Actually over the last several decades we are getting information more and more on social media, so people are getting small amounts of information. Not too much real knowledge and that's part of the problem. People are making judgments based on tiny amounts of truth or half-truth or non-truths, and it's impossible to know, by the social media, what is really true. Is Trump the cause of this? I don't think so. I think Trump is just a part of the picture that we live in today.

Mohamed Shire, Mogadishu, Somalia

In this April 24, 2017, photo, Mohamed Shire
(Credit: AP/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

Q: Is the Trump administration more bark than bite?

A: This might be a new step; this might be a new strategy. We probably have to wait and see, but I think the United States administration needs to be very careful in just getting involved in Somalia without having a clear strategy and program that they align with the current Somali government.

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Juan Pablo Bolanos, Mexico City

In this April 20, 2017, photo, Juan Pablo
(Credit: AP/Eduardo Verdugo)

Q: Is the Trump administration more bark than bite?

A: I think it's a bit of both. On the issue of sending Mexicans back, it is being fulfilled by the guy, Trump, and on the issue of building the wall, I definitely think he will not achieve it.

Mahmoud Draghmeh, Nablus, West Bank

In this April 24, 2017, photo, Mahmoud Draghmeh
(Credit: AP/Nasser Nasser)

Q: Are we now living in a ‘post-truth’ world?

A: The world is far from the truth, despite the fact the technological development helped the news to reach. But I think that there is a distance from the truth, because the media, with all my respect to the different media outlets, everyone adopts his idea and exports it to the world.

Ra So Yon, Pyongyang, North Korea

In this April 24, 2017, image made from
(Credit: AP)

Q: Has Trump changed your views about America?

A: After Trump became president, there has been no improvement in America's image. If America doesn't stop its aggression against us and pressure on us, then we'll never have any good image of America; it will only get worse. We'll never be surprised, whatever America does. And we're not expecting any surprises from Trump.

Hamza Abu Maria, Hebron, West Bank

In this April 24, 2017 photo, Hamza Abu
(Credit: AP/Nasser Nasser)

Q: Has Trump changed your views about America?

A: I'm about 30 years old, and since I grew up and started to understand and follow news, I don't think the United States up until today was a beacon of democracy. If it was truly democratic, then from a long time ago they would have done justice to the Palestinian people.

Margret Machner, Berlin

In this April 24, 2017, photo, Magret Machner
(Credit: AP/Markus Schreiber)

Q: Has Trump changed your views about America?

My trust at the moment is a lot less than it was earlier. One had the feeling that America was a strong, safe partner and I do not believe this anymore.

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Yuri (no last name given), Moscow

In this April 21, 2017, image made from
(Credit: AP/Vladimir Kondrashov)

Q: Has Trump changed your views about America?

A: Nothing actually had changed, for real. Nothing had changed in Russian-American relations. They aren't our friends or enemies. Geopolitical enemies, maybe, that's it.

Mohammad Ali, Damascus, Syria

In this April 23, 2017, image made from
(Credit: AP)

Q: Has Trump changed your views about America?

A: We should never bet on any American administration, either Republican or Democrat. It's the same front, supposedly to fight terrorism, but they didn't do any of that. Instead they carried out an aggression against a sovereign state, which is Syria. They attacked Syria and they attacked the air base of a sovereign state and a member of the Arab League.

Deqo Salaad, Mogadishu, Somalia

In this April 24, 2017, photo, Deqo Salaad
(Credit: AP/Farah Abdi Warsameh)

Q: Has Trump changed your views about America?

A: The U.S. was once both the beacon of democracy and human rights, but nowadays, a big change has happened as we can see more segregation committed by President Trump, especially when he said he was going to ban Muslims coming to the U.S. And with that, he has damaged the reputation of the U.S. of being the beacon of democracy and human rights in this world that the U.S. government promoted for ages now.

Ute Hubner, Berlin

In this April 24, 2017, photo, Ute Hubner
(Credit: AP/Markus Schreiber)

Q: What has surprised you about President Trump?

A: I find he is very honest — more honest than I thought in the sense that a lot isn't pushed under the table. He says it like it is, while here in our case so much is said and talked about that "everything is fine, wonderful and all is good," while we know that the reality is more often than not something else.

Payam Mosleh, Tehran, Iran

In this April 22, 2017, photo, Payam Mosleh,
(Credit: AP/Ebrahim Noroozi)

Q: What has surprised you about President Trump?

A: What scared me most was the classification of human beings (under Trump's proposed Muslim ban). I think history has taught and shown us enough times that separating people from each other has never done anyone any good. Building walls either in Berlin or America has no results and is disastrous.

Mahdieh Gharib, Tehran, Iran

In this April 22, 2017, photo, Mahdieh Gharib,
(Credit: AP/Ebrahim Noroozi)

Q: What has surprised you about President Trump?

A: What surprised me most was preventing Iranians from entering the United States or even barring those Iranians who were U.S. residents and had temporarily left that country. Bombing Syria was the second thing that surprised me.

Fatmeh (full name not given), Damascus, Syria

In this April 23, 2017, image made from
(Credit: AP)

Q: What has surprised you about President Trump?

A: Trump increased problems in the Arab world and the first proof is the strike on Syria. This has increased problems and confusion. He didn't do anything against terrorism; he only increased it. There is nothing new. His policy has been to oppress people, especially the Arab people. We didn't see anything new.

Shimon Abitbol, Tel Aviv, Israel

In this April 23, 2017, photo, Shimon Abitbol
(Credit: AP/Tsafrir Abayov)

Q: What has surprised you about President Trump?

A: He's playing too much golf. That's the only thing I'm surprised by. I mean, how can he have so much time to play so much golf?

This combination of images shows people interviewed by
(Credit: AP)

This combination of images shows people interviewed by the Associated Press regarding President Donald Trump's first 100 days in office. Top row left to right: Diane Lallouz in Tel Aviv, Israel; Payam Mosleh in Tehran, Iran; Hamza Abu Maria in Ramallah, West Bank; Shahrzad Ebrahimi in Tehran; Dan Mirkin in Tel Aviv; Fatmeh (full name not given) in Damascus, Syria; Mohamed Shire in Mogadishu, Somalia. Bottom row left to right: Yuri (last name not given) in Moscow; Shimon Abitbol in Tel Aviv; Raya Sauerbrun in Tel Aviv; Ute Hubner in Berlin; Juan Pablo Bolanos in Mexico City; Ra So Yon in Pyongyang, North Korea; and Mohammad Ali in Damascus.

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